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A woman in Taipei loves yogurt so much, she'll go to any lengths to figure out which of her roommates took the last of her delicious snack from the refrigerator...even if it means launching a full-scale police investigation.


The unnamed woman, a student at Chinese Culture University in Taipei, returned home in November to find her bottle of yogurt discarded in the trash can after someone ate the contents. She immediately confronted her roommates, who all claimed they were innocent of the dastardly deed.

In most cases, the story would end there. But not this time! The woman took her empty yogurt bottle to the police station and demanded local officers open an investigation into which of her roommates was the yogurt thief. To the surprise of almost everyone involved, the police agreed.

When the cops couldn't find any fingerprints on the bottle, they decided to use more drastic measures: DNA testing. The department spent around $500 performing a series of genetic tests on both the roommates and the $2 bottle of yogurt, which ultimately revealed which of the woman's housemates was untrustworthy.

On Twitter, yogurt fans understood the woman's passion for justice:




Others thought bringing criminal charges against a yogurt thief could be an overreaction.

The guilty party is now facing charges of theft, though the police department has come under fire from Taipei's citizens for its misuse of funds and time.

A local resident told Apple Daily:

"It is a waste of social resources. If I were the policeman, I would buy a bottle [of yogurt] to give to her. The cost of manpower and material resources is too great."

An unnamed police officer also likened the entire ordeal to "using a cannon to shoot birds," which seems like a pretty apt metaphor.

A special note to college students everywhere: Sometimes, your yogurt will get eaten. It's okay to be mad, but going to the police may be a step too far.

H/T - BBC, Munchies

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

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