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A German woman named Lisa M. Ca, who uses the name Ostdrossel on Tumblr, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Etsy, has always had a love of birds. When she moved from Germany to Michigan to be with her husband she noticed the similarities in climate, and the major differences in the varieties of birds.


Lisa told Detroit Metro Times about her desire to learn more about these new birds.

"I wanted to get a little closer and started researching what cameras are out there as a little addition to my DSLR. This is how I found the Bird Photo Booth."

The Bird Photo Booth she references is a device used to capture hi-res, close-up shots of birds while they eat at the attached bird feeder using a motion sensor to sense when a bird is there. Lisa's photo booth can capture around 7000 photos in one day, which she spends her evenings sorting through to find the best shots.

Lisa's photos have become an internet success, as she has a talent for choosing the shots that showcase the birds' unique features and personalities.


Cardinals:

The Northern Cardinal, or Cardinalis cardinalis, is one of the better-known North American birds. Their bright red plumage is hard to miss, and makes the Cardinal easy to identify.





Starlings:

Sturnus vulgaris, or the Common Starling, may be beautiful with it's iridescent feathers and intricate patterns, but it is actually an invasive species. Starlings can be useful to farmers when their huge flocks eat insects and other pests in the fields, but they can become the pests themselves when they devour whole fields of fruit or other crops.





Bluebirds:

Sialia sialis are easily identified by their bright blue and orange-brown plumage. They range throughout the eastern part of North America, and can travel as far south as Nicaragua in Central America!




Finches:

Several species of the genus Haemorhous roam through Michigan. They are also frequently kept as pets.




Bluejays:

Bluejays, also known as Cyanocitta cristata, are another easily recognized species. Their bright blue, black, and white markings set them apart from the many other species of birds that live in the area.




Baltimore Orioles:

The namesake of Baltimore's MLB team, male Baltimore Orioles (Icterus galbula) are easily spotted by their contrasting black and bright orange coloring.




Grackles:

The common grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) ranges throughout central and eastern United States, and up into southern Canada. They can be easily identified by their black and slightly iridescent blue bodies and bright yellow eyes.



Mourning Doves:

Mourning doves are the source of that haunting "coooo, coooo" sound you may have heard in urban areas. Zenaida macroura range throughout North and Central America, so if you've been to the US or Mexico, you have probably seen or heard them.





Wait...Those aren't birds!



Lisa has captured some amazing bird pictures over the years, showcasing the sheer variety of birds that frequent her area of Michigan. Of the birds her camera captures, Lisa says:

"The birds are like little jewels from nature. They make my day."

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