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The love of a grandparent is one of those things that makes people feel all warm and fuzzy inside. We see it all the time in movies, we hear about it in our families and from our friends, Spongebob had a whole episode about Grandma's love. All of that is adorable, but it's nothing compared to the aggressive cuteness of Jen Barclay and her grandpa.


Jen is a young woman living in Scotland. She and her grandpa have a very close relationship, which she often talks about to her followers. Talking is one thing - but videos are better. So Jen started recording videos of her grandfather and edited them together to make a sort of highlights reel. The cutest part is that it's just shots of him opening the door when she comes to visit.

There is something so pure and loving in the grin that crosses his face every time he sees her. Also, he calls her "honey bun" - and everyone knows food-related nicknames are worth, like, 50 extra grandpa points.

Jen's video took off like a rocket. Twitter fell absolutely madly in love with Grandpa; so did we.










Know what else we all fell for? His grandpa swag!









Jen was really overwhelmed by the reaction her video got - and it's easy to understand why. As we type this, the video has almost 8 MILLION views. It's got close to six thousand comments. Jen has been getting messages and requests about it since it went up. People really, really, loved Grandpa and they wanted to know more about the cheerful, cheeky and fashionable fellow.

So Jen made him an Instagram account!


The first post was an official introduction - and yes of COURSE he was rocking a super cool sweater in the picture.


We're off to go follow some of Grandad's adventures in swag. See you there!
H/T: Twitter, Instagram

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

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