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Photo via YouTube/Charlotte Police Dept.

After she directed a racist rant toward two black women, a woman became the subject of a viral hashtag. Now she's received an arraignment date in criminal court.


Susan Westwood, 51, is the woman the internet dubbed #SouthParkSusan following a booze-fueled tirade that was captured on video by the two women she was harassing.


SouthPark Susan tells sisters "I'm White & I make 125,000 a yr" "You Don't Belong" www.youtube.com

She accused the two sisters of selling drugs and trespassing, among other things, while bragging that she makes "$125,000 a year" and the price of her rent.




Well, in good news for us non-racists, the video went viral, causing Susan Westwood to be fired by Spectrum Communication, who provided her "salary".




And more good news on the horizon--because of her bogus call to 911, Westwood was arrested for "contact[ing] 911 to falsely claim that individuals near her residence were attempting to break into nearby residences," according to Charlotte Police.

Her call to 911 reportedly lasted over five minutes and included such phrases as:

"We need to get them out of here, because they're causing problems. . . . I don't mean to be mean and rude and awful, but we need to get them out of here."

And:

"They are actually people that I've never seen here before — but they are African American."




Westwood also at one point asked the 911 dispatcher to arrest the two women for taking photos of her. The dispatcher pointed out that photography was not a crime and Westwood offered to "pay $2,500 to get [the women] out of here right now," adding, "I'm not going to stand for it."




Westwood was released on $300 bond from custody, but not before she took this very white and hot mugshot.


Interesting how being a racist ages you.

H/T: Washington Post, Twitter

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

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