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Ladies and germs, the wait is over.

After Prince Harry and Meghan Markle welcomed their son into the world on Monday, we finally have a name.

World, meet Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.


Even better, we are finally getting see pictures of the newborn two days after being born.

The Duke and Duchess have chosen to keep their plans surrounding the birth of their son private, and now the proud parents are having their first official family pictures taken on the grounds of Windsor.

Check out the gorgeous photos, courtesy of the Royal Family.


The name is short for Archibald, which is composed of Germanic elements erchan (meaning "genuine" and "precious") and bald ("bold.")

Archies around the world must be proud to share their namesake with Baby Sussex.

Twitter pounced at the opportunity to have some fun with the newly announced name and teased the royal baby with a reference from the CW TV show, Riverdale.









Of course, we can't forget the original comics on which the teen drama series is based. Archie Comics announced their glee in two words.









Riverdale diehards always root for the underdog.





Riverdale's reach is powerful.






But the show's influence across the pond proved inferior to that of the Queen's.



The photo opp is a break from tradition, as Prince William and Kate previously introduced Prince George, Princess Charlotte, and Prince Louis from the steps of St. Mary's Hospital hours after their births.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex also deviated from another tradition, with the 37-year-old royal giving birth in Windsor, where the couple reside at Frogmore Cottage.

Archie, additionally known as is seventh in the line of succession after Prince Charles, Prince William, Prince George, Princess Charlotte, Prince Louis and Harry.

We still think you're All in the Family, Archie Bunker.


Archie is also one of the first biracial heirs in the British royal family, after "Queen Charlotte in the 1800s was believed to be of mixed race and went on to have 15 children."

The world is pleased to make your acquaintance, Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor.

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


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Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
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Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
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Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


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