JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
fluffiestboy/TikTok

A heartwarming TikTok has been circulating the internet, showing a trans teen that was given a beautiful birthday surprise by his classmates, causing him to break down in tears.


Andi Bernabe was already surprised to find a choir room full of friends and classmates on his 18th birthday:

"They've been planning this for a month. You're abt to see why," reads the caption.

Within no time at all, the reason is revealed.

"Since you're like a legal adult," a classmate who walked over said, "we kinda raised enough money for you to change your name."





After receiving the envelope, Andi bursts into tears.

The video blew up on Tik Tok and has over 944,000 likes.





Bernabe, who's from the greater Dallas area, says that he had "no clue at all, not even hints."

"They made this fake paper birth certificate and they all signed it," Bernabe told Yahoo! Lifestyle.

"I obviously dropped down to the floor and started crying. It was overwhelming honestly, I couldn't believe they actually did it, especially since it's $300. I was planning on getting a job to pay for it, and just putting a little bit away every month."





$300 is roughly the fee for a name change in Texas.

The party the group planned for him was also in celebration of this big step in Bernabe's life.

"All the decorations were 'It's a boy!'-themed. The cake was strawberry and they put blue icing on top," he said. "The joke was, 'Oh, we accidentally made a pink cake for a girl but it turned out to be a boy'."

Texas has been notably unfriendly to its transgender residents, continually denying transgender citizens equal protections under the law, and seeing a number of transgender homicides in major metropolitan areas.

This small show of kindness is a step in the right direction for Texas and its future citizens.

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

Keep reading... Show less