The best kind of revenge? Success.


Thanks to Reddit user Lethkhar for sharing their story.

I used to work recording concerts for my school's conservatory. Basically, students could pay a fee for the conservatory to record their concerts and put it on a CD for them. I had had the job as a work/study since I was a Freshman, and I loved it.

In the second half of my senior year, I received a call from my boss saying that I had messed up a CD and that I needed to meet him in the studio to fix it at 4PM. I thought that was an odd request. Mistakes sometimes happen, but all of the employees knew how to fix it themselves and I was the most experienced worker he had at that point. I asked if I could just fix it earlier and submit it to our office assistant, but he insisted I come in at 4.

I showed up about fifteen minutes before 4 to figure out what had gone wrong. I put the CD in, and immediately could hear that it was a CD of a completely different concert. That was really bizarre, but we have backups of all the audio so I just burned another CD of the correct concert from that.

As the CD was burning, my boss came in and told me that I was fired. He said screwing up a CD that badly was unacceptable. I had never been fired before, this was the longest I had ever had a job, and I was totally blindsided. To this day I have no idea how the wrong concert ended up on that CD.


Continue this story on the next page.

The best I can figure is the office assistant mixed up CD's or something, but whoever's fault it was it was a really easy problem to fix. I argued with him for a bit by telling him that I thought he was making a mistake, and this really wasn't a big deal. But he refused to listen.

Just when I had resigned myself to my fate, the newly burned CD popped out of the computer. We both looked at it for about 5 seconds in silence. Then I laughed, handed it to him and shook his hand, then walked out the door.

I wasn't done, though. I loved that job, and I felt wronged. I was also saving up for a trip to Europe, and didn't want to have to cancel it. (I already had tickets to Wacken).

Without a job or a girlfriend, I had a lot of time on my hands that last semester. So I decided I would just start my own business recording students' concerts using my own equipment.

I charged a slightly lower fee than my former employer and put up ads online and around the conservatory.

I advertised that I was more experienced than anyone working for conservatory audio, and frankly my equipment was better as long as they weren't playing at one of the bigger venues. Especially for jazz.


Continue to the next page to see how this story ends!

Also, instead of burning CD's I offered to just send it to them digitally, which a lot of students preferred because they would get it within an hour or two of the end of the concert rather than several days later.

College students are cheap, and it didn't take long before I had to hire my own assistant to keep up with all the concerts we were recording.

I probably ended up cutting the conservatory audio department's business by at least 20%. My former boss was livid, and he made a couple of unsuccessful attempts to shut us down.

I earned more money that semester than I probably had in my previous 3.5 years combined of working for someone else. I was just mad at myself for not doing it earlier.


Know someone who would like this story? Be sure to share it with them :)

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

Some years ago, I had to advise a college friend to stop chasing the girl he was interested in at the time. She'd already turned him down. Explicitly. At least two or three times.

He wouldn't take no for an answer and didn't see anything wrong with his behavior.

Perhaps he'd seen too many movies where the guy eventually breaks through the girl's defenses and essentially coerces her into going out with him?

Keep reading... Show less
Caleb Woods/Unsplash

Parents make mistakes. We want to believe that parents are doing there very best to raise their kids, but sometimes they do more harm than good.

Research into childhood trauma didn't actually begin until the 1970s, so we don't have as much knowledge about our mental health as adults as we might like.

However, a study that followed 1,420 from 1992 to 2015 found conclusive results about childhood trauma:

"'It is a myth to believe that childhood trauma is a rare experience that only affects few,' the researchers say."
"Rather, their population sample suggests, 'it is a normative experience—it affects the majority of children at some point.'"
"A surprising 60 percent of those in the study were exposed to at least one trauma by age 16. Over 30 percent were exposed to multiple traumatic events."

Not all of the things our parents do that were not so helpful technically classify as trauma, but it definitely has an effect on us as we get older.

Keep reading... Show less
Ann on Unsplash

Breaking up is something that never gets easier.

Keep reading... Show less

On the outside, so many professions and careers look glamorous, financially enticing, and fun.

Often we sit back in our own lives and wallow in our dead-end jobs with that "wish I could do that for a living mentality!"

But if you look a little closer or, much like Dorothy Gale in OZ, just wait for a Toto to push the curtain back, you'll see that a lot more is going on behind the scenes.

And the shenanigans we don't see, make all that fun... evaporate.

So many careers and high power industries are built on a foundation of lies, backstabbing, and stress. And not in that fun "Dynasty" way.

That quiet, dead-end gig may not be so bad after all.

Redditor MethodicallyDeep wanted hear all the tea about certain careers, by asking:

What is a secret in your industry that should be talked about?
Keep reading... Show less