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Demi Sweeney is a young woman just trying to live her life as a student in the UK. Debbie is bright and, like many people her age, she's comfortable with technology. That technological comfort came in handy one day when she found herself trapped home alone with a spider. Demi is terrified of spiders, so she devised a plan using the resources she had on hand: her phone and a little bit of spending money in her bank account. She ordered some food from an app and in the notes she asked the delivery person to please get rid of the spider.


First, she ran it by the app's help desk. They told her they couldn't guarantee a side of spider-death with her fried chicken since it was possible that whoever delivered her food would also be afraid of spiders, but that she was welcome to give it a shot. Demi ordered herself some chicken, made her request to the driver, and waited.

It worked, you guys!

The delivery guy, Joe, was afraid of spiders but he had a helmet and a sense of humor so he gave it a shot. Demi got him a chair and some paper towels and he got to work. It didn't go smoothly or according to plan but it gave everyone involved a good laugh.

"When I pointed at the top of the stairs handing him the tissue roll and getting him a chair to stand on, he then reached for the spider and accidentally dropped it on the floor where it began to run, which made me panic more. He said: 'Look away, don't look. I thanked him around 50 times; he kept saying this is so funny, whilst laughing. I wanted to hug him. A real-life hero."


The spider was flushed down the toilet, which left Demi afraid to use the bathroom for the rest of the day. But at least it wasn't hovering just over her head anymore. She posted about it on Twitter and thanked the delivery app. They found the situation as funny as we did and gave Joe a shout out.

Twitter was inspired.






Don't worry about Demi making a habit out of this. She admitted it would get really expensive and she normally has more people on hand to help. Desperate times called for desperate delivery measures!

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