Things Non-Americans Think Everyone In The United States Has In Their Home

Things Non-Americans Think Everyone In The United States Has In Their Home
Photo by Outsite Co on Unsplash

An English friend was shocked when they visited me once and found that I actually have a kettle. I do! And I use it all the time. "Shall I put the kettle on?" is a common phrase you'd hear in my apartment.

But many Americans do not have one. Tea just hasn't caught on here the way it has in the United Kingdom, so UK residents are always baffled by this. The kettle is a way of life!

But enough of what foreigners might be surprised to find in our homes. Let's talk about the things they would find. For instance, peanut butter. I always have peanut butter in my home. And I think a foreigner would be shocked if I didn't!


Non-Americans shared their thoughts with us after Redditor Rylx asked the online community:

"Non-Americans, what do you think every American person has in their house?"

"A switch..."

"A switch that when you flick it it turns your sink into a blender."

Kingdom-Kome

This is a funny way to describe a garbage disposal.

I've never had one but have been in quite a few homes over the years that do!

"Popcorn..."

"Popcorn setting on their microwave!"

[deleted]

Believe it or not, I don't have one! Not having a microwave might have something to do with that.

"Apparently..."

"Apparently Americans are rather fond of Pickles and Peanut Butter. Is that a fair assumption to make?"

tree-of-lies

Well, not combined, but yes.

"This fascinated me..."

"Oh oh, the washing machines where you put everything in the top! This fascinated me when we visited the states. They’re huge!"

Tired3520

My friend has one where the dryer is actually at the top! That should blow your mind.

"Large quantities..."

"Large quantities of over-the-counter drugs in huge bottles."

Wombattalion

Like Tylenol and Ibuprofen?

Yes, actually.

"A plastic bag..."

"A plastic bag filled with plastic bags."

bird-137

Perfect for the bathroom garbage can!

"Every American household..."

"Every American household has a drawer full with random stuff (died batteries, screws, shoelace etc.) right?"

Firm-Ideal5256

Ah, the junk drawer!

Speaking of which, I need to sort through mine.

"A coffee machine..."

"A coffee machine with large glass jug full of black coffee being kept warm. The UK mostly has electric kettles for making hot drinks individually."

UnfinishedUntidy

I do not have that one — I have a mocha pot. It's simple!

"A fridge..."

"A fridge with ice dispenser built in."

FunAccountant7632

I have one but the ice dispenser isn't hooked up. I've made do.

"A dishwasher."

"A dishwasher. All of you have one, right?"

SakuraUnicorn

Ha, I wish! I am the dishwasher. Always have been.

To the rest of the world, Americans have a ton of different luxuries. Honestly, all I want is a laundry machine. I hate washing clothes in laundromats (and that's precisely why I have other people do it for me).

Have some thoughts of your own? Tell us more in the comments below!

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