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Sesame Street

Iconic kids' show Sesame Street is bringing back a character that was first introduced in 2011 to talk about the topic of childhood hunger. It seems things have gone from bad to worse.


Lily, a seven-year-old Muppet, is now teaching children about homelessness with a storyline that involves her family having to move in with friends after losing their apartment.

The president of global impact and philanthropy for Sesame Workshop, Sherrie Westin, said:

"Lily is the first Muppet we've created whose story line includes that she is experiencing homelessness.
I think we tend to think of homelessness as an adult issue and don't always look at it through the lens of a child, and we realize that Sesame has a unique ability to do that, to look at tough issues with the lens of a child."


A Rainbow Kind of Day youtu.be

Some folks on Twitter felt there was already a homeless character.










But then someone pointed out...


With that cleared up, people could focus on Lily's current situation.






We hope Lily and her family are able to get back on their feet very soon.

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