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Now, this isn't going to be a long, "Let's all pile on how bad the internet is and only think about the good ol' days when the rocks were soft and we only communicated using cans with string."


Obviously, the internet has brought a lot into our lives, running the full spectrum of both good and bad. However, there is a bit of nostalgia still for the pre-internet days. Those times when you'd have to wait by the phone and the only way to send photos was in the mail.

Reddit user, u/IRunFast24, wanted to know what the best things in life were before we were plugged in when they asked:

People old enough to remember life pre-Internet, what are some less obvious things you miss about that time?

Many habits we used to possess were made completely irrelevant thanks to the internet. Not that we didn't enjoy doing them, we just started asking ourselves, "What's the point?"

Completely Devoid Of Technological Interference

"Leaving home and just being gone for the day. No cell phones. If there were cameras, it was really different. You used them to take pictures of things or had people take pictures of you. But there was no social media to preoccupy your mind. It was just doing something. And whoever you were with, was who you were with."

NakedKittyAlucard

No One Needs 24 Hours Of Nonsense

"News only being on at 6pm. That was it. Now we have 6 hours of local news and 24 hours of cable news. Not being bombarded all day with "news." And when you saw "Breaking News" on the screen you knew something serious went down."

Drumwife91

You Mean We Actually Have To Go?

"It used to be a lot harder to bail on things. You'd have to call the person at home and tell them yourself, or at least leave a message if you wanted to be risky. Typically if you were gonna bail you'd give at least 24 hours notice. Nowadays people can let you know they're bailing last second since you're always reachable."

jrhawk42

Take My Cocktail Napkin Map

"I miss the days when people didn't have immediate directions to any place. There was an art required to giving effective directions and drawing an abstract map of the important turning points."

MurrayTempleton

"RSVPing mattered. If you said you were going to be there, you made sure to be there. None of this facebook invites that everyone blows off without any form of social repercussions. If you said you were going to go and didn't go, you were the a--hole and everyone knew it."

APotatoPancake

The Art Of The Bar Argument

"Bar bets. And just bar discussion, generally. So many fun, running conversations involving friends and strangers are now cut short because you can just Google the answer."

TwoDrinkDave

You can get almost anything on the internet. Almost.

Still no sign of real working Lightsabers anywhere out there, but the internet has eliminated many of our purchasing practices.

Just In Time For The Holidays!

"The Sears catalog. That was how I found out about all the cool new toys."

CatapultemHabeo

"Catalogs in general, for me. Before the internet made mindless browsing of stuff you didn't need ~really~ easy to do, we still liked doing this without having to drive to the mall. The solution? Sign your mom up for those cool seed catalogs, those not safe to browse at the office gag gift catalogs and then everything in between. That stuff was really nice to have when you grew up somewhere that was not even cable ready."

Chicory-Coffee

1 Good Song Out Of 15

"When you bought new music you just had to hope it was good. The single might be popular but otherwise unless someone had it you just bought it and hoped for the best."

LewisEFurr

"There was so much excitement to going to a cd store to buy an album that you only knew one song of or the band/artist name and just listening to that entire cd over and over again picking out which tracks were your favorite while still learning every lyric to all the songs on the album.

Building a cd collection was also fun."

kittybidapadoop

Talk About The "Immediate Gratification" Generation, Huh?

"The instant win bottle caps / candy / chocolate bar wrappers where you could turn them back into the store and immediately get a free one. Now it's just codes you have to register on their website so they can get your info, i don't even bother anymore."

SuperNobody-MWO

Reddit Users Share Their Best 'It's A Small World After All' Experience

Finally, there's these activities, too difficult to explain to anyone who wasn't there. How do you illustrate to someone not having a supercomputer in your pocket at all hours of the day radically changed your life?

Keeping It In Front Of You

"I miss having an attention span of more than three seconds"

twomorelambbhunas

"It's so weird. I can only vaguely remember what it feels like to not have a smartphone and to be alone and think.

Wondering what my friends are doing and if they'd like to do something on the weekend. We'd have to talk during lunch break at school and plan it...

Trying to find the answer to a math problem... Having to figure it out by re-reading the problem and explanations 5 times."

BlueFlob

Click-Click-Search

"Information you had meant something.

Now a 5 year old that knows how to google has more information than you."

KyorlSadei

Learning Was A Little Slower

"Media consumption was different. If you were reading a book, you couldn't search for it on a forum where 100 people had already analyzed it and figured out the twist.

It was more difficult to have a movie spoiled. When The Phantom Menace came out I had no idea what was in any part of the movie.

If you didn't know a skill you had to find someone who knew and have them teach you, you couldn't look it up on YouTube.

It was plausible that you could get the Triforce in Ocarina of Time and that your buddy's uncle really did work for Nintendo, because you couldn't look it up and find that it was not true."

ProbablyGayingOnYou

There Used To Be A Time When You Couldn't Play Everything

"Not being overwhelmed by choice.

Don't get me wrong, having nearly every form of media downloadable is great, but back in the day, i rented a video game and i played that video game as much as i could.

Now, its hard to give it more than 2 seconds before i try one of the 20,000 games i have access to.

New game plus used to be cool. Now, I'm happy if just beat the game"

mattcruise

Floundering. Just A Little.

"My formative years were the 1980s. I remember like yesterday going to study in Paris my junior year of college. I got off the plane with no cell phone, no internet, a Let's Go Paris book, and just a hostel address written on a piece of paper I'd stuck in a French dictionary. I did not know a single person in all of France.

I had $500 of cash stuck in a money belt. The belt was tight and sweaty but that money had to last me for at least a month until I could find a part-time job with my lousy French. My "credit card" was my father's credit card numbers written down on a piece of paper. He told me I could only use it to buy a plane ticket home in an emergency.

I remember standing in the airport and having this powerful emotion of being 21 years old, scared sh-tless, but in absolutely completely control of my own destiny. There was absolutely nobody who could come rushing to my aid if I needed it. I was 100% on my own.

I'm actually very thankful for that experience. I found the hostel. I found a job. I made friends. I learned French. I made it all on my own which was just a big boost in life confidence.

I have no doubt if I'd had a cell phone I would've called my parents on Day 2, told them it was too hard, and been on the next plane home. But I had no other choice but to succeed."

gold_and_diamond

We can never go back.

Not really, anyway.

The only way is to keep going forward, be aware of the effect the internet has on us, and do our best to not let it take away the things that really matter in our lives.

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