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Image by Alfred Derks from Pixabay

One of the most annoying things I swear you only see in movies is the "I can explain!" trope. You know the one: A character stumbles upon something they very likely completely misconstrued... and then they decide to be little more than a child and refuse to listen to anyone's attempts to clear the air. Suffice it to say that if there isn't a misunderstanding (no matter how shallow) then there's no movie! It's so frustrating!

After Redditor whosactualmanisthis asked the online community, "What commonly occurs in movies that doesn't usually happen in real life?" people weighed in with their observations.


"News reports that apparently..."

News reports that apparently repeat themselves every minute or two. Enough time for somebody to see a news report, pick up the phone, call somebody to tell them to turn on the TV, then, without changing channels, the reporter immediately starts taking it from the top once again.

With cars, news reports are magic in that they are relevant to the situation and start immediately after the driver turns on the radio.

LBDShow

"People with lower-middle-class jobs..."

People with lower-middle-class jobs that live in a nice, large house in an upper-middle-class suburban neighborhood.

crucifix_peen

"Getting knocked unconscious..."

Getting knocked unconscious for hours and then coming to and being perfectly fine.

Simon_Mendehlsson

"A beautiful successful woman..."

A beautiful successful woman has trouble attracting men because she's clumsy.

FancyStegosaurus

"Pretty sure that doesn't happen..."

Morgue and autopsy rooms frequently feature a coroner eating a pastrami sandwich over, or near a corpse. It's like a Hollywood inside joke. Pretty sure that doesn't happen, and would probably violate a bunch of health codes.

Haggisboy

"A house full of kids..."

A house full of kids and the whole home is pristine. In real life, there's always going to be some toy or art project laying around and most likely damage to the furniture.

zerbey

"In murder mysteries..."

In murder mysteries, the person you didn't think was the killer turns out to be the killer. In most cases, the person most likely to be the killer is the killer and it is pretty obvious they did it.

totoropoko

"Very rarely..."

People time their conversations perfectly. Very rarely do people start talking at the same time.

ActurariallySound

"Person trying to hack into something..."

Person trying to hack into something types aggressively for 5 seconds and then says "I'm in!"

Upbeat_Parsnip2607

"People working in a very fancy office..."

People working in a very fancy office yet never having to work, just gossiping/leaving the office to go to their penthouse/on an adventure, no questions asked.

wishiwasrich31

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