Muslim Activists Step Up To Raise Thousands Of Dollars For Victims Of The Synagogue Shooting
Photo by Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

In a country that's as divided as we are now, it's nice to see two groups from two very different walks of life come together to support each other in a time of tragedy.


On October 28, 11 people were left dead after a shooter opened fire on a service at the Tree Of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Politicians were quick to condemn the attack, but Trump took it a step further in suggesting the Synagogue needed an armed guard, and that the perpetrator, Robert Bowers, should be given the death penalty for "indescribable" acts.

Politicians respond to 'evil' synagogue shooting www.youtube.com

A group of Muslim activists have come together in hopes of showing solidarity and unity with the Jewish community who have been so affected by the tragedy.

From the campaign:

"We wish to respond to evil with good, as our faith instructs us, and send a powerful message of compassion through action. Our Prophet Muhammad, peace be upon him, said: 'Show mercy to those on earth, and the One in the Heavens will show mercy to you.' The Quran also teaches us to 'Repel evil by that which is better'(41:34)."

The project began with a goal at $25,000, which they hit within six hours. Since then, they have updated their goal four times, and within 50 hours of the beginning of the campaign, had reached $177,000.

The funds will be disbursed for "help with the immediate, short-term needs of the injured victims and grieving families - including funeral expenses and medical bills. No amount of money will bring back their loved ones, but we do hope to lessen their burden in some way."





"Through this campaign, we hope to send a united message from the Jewish and Muslim communities that there is no place for this type of hate and violence in America. We pray that this restores a sense of security and peace to the Jewish-American community who has undoubtedly been shaken by this event."






CelebrateMercy, the organization spearheading the fundraiser, also sprang into action in 2017 to repair vandalized headstones at a Jewish cemetery in St. Louis, Missouri. That campaign raised $150,000.

"This could have just as easily happened at a Mosque, or a Hindu Temple, or against people of color," said Tarek El-Messidi, the founding director of CelebrateMercy. "This is a time when one group, who is feeling other-ized and discriminated against, could reach out in peace and solidarity and love to another group that feels the same."




The campaign is taking donations for another week.

H/T: Twitter, Mashable

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