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In an unlikely new role for the beloved mid-2000s sitcom,'The Office' can now be credited as a literal lifesaver.


Cross Scott jumped into action once he noticed a woman (whom local newspapers have identified solely as "Clara") was unconscious behind the wheel of her car. Adrenaline took hold and he got her out by smashing her window with a rock.

Upon noticing the woman was not breathing, he began doing CPR--with chest compressions to the rhythm of "Staying Alive."


The Office CPR Complete scene. www.youtube.com

"I've never prepared myself for CPR in my life," Scott said. "I had no idea what I was doing."

Scott only says he was able to execute the life-saving maneuver because he recalled the episode of The Office above.



Reportedly, as he was doing the chest compressions, he actually sang the words to "Staying Alive" aloud.

At some point (likely around "I'm goin' nowhere, somebody help me," in the song) the paramedics showed up to take Clara to the hospital.

The paramedics thanked Scott for performing CPR, as she may have been in worse condition by the time they got there without it.

The Office caught on to the fact that they are now lifesavers.



And everybody is taking notice.








Apparently, the episode is actually used to train EMTs and CPR/AED certification seekers:


Saving a life to the beat of 'Staying Alive' www.youtube.com


So, The Office really knows what it's talking about!






Cross Scott, 21, is the lead technician at Jack Furrier Tire & Auto Care in Tucson, Arizona, and was on his way to work when the incident occurred.

After the incident, Scott went to the hospital to check on Clara and see how she was doing, only to find she'd already been released.

"All I could think about was picturing her face," Scott said. "I had to make sure she was OK. That's the only reason why I went to the hospital."

"I imagine, what if that was my sister on the side of the road or my mom on the side of the road? Unfortunately my mom isn't here to see that, but it's mainly for her. To be honest, it's all for her."






We're looking forward to seeing what other functions The Office may serve, and whose lives they may save.

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

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