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The fact that sexuality is a spectrum is now a familiar concept to many, but society continues to insist that people label themselves with easy-to-digest summaries of their desires: gay, straight, bisexual, etc. But Lucas Hedges, star of Boy Erased, wants to exist in a world beyond over-simplifying labels such as these. In a recent interview with Vulture, Hedges commented that he identifies in a nebulous area between gay and straight.


In the interview, Hedges commented:

In the early stages of my life, some of the people I was most infatuated with were my closest male friends. That was the case through high school, and I think I was always aware that while for the most part I was attracted to women, I existed on a spectrum.



He went on to say:

I felt ashamed that I wasn't 100%, because it was clear that one side of sexuality presents issues, and the other doesn't as much. I recognize myself as existing on that spectrum: Not totally straight, but also not gay and not necessarily bisexual.


Twitter was incredibly supportive of Hedge's honesty:





Hedges feels that even though society presses us to identify as something its familiar with, there's no need to do so—while giving oneself a label can be helpful to some who seek community and validation, it's not a necessity if you feel it only serves to put your true feelings in a box that doesn't quite fit.




Thank you, Lucas, for helping us all to understand the world a little better!




H/T - Teen Vogue, Vulture

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