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Karle Robinson, a 61-year-old resident of Kansas, was moving into his new home August 12 when police saw him carrying his television into the house. Since he was finishing his move late at night, he understood why they might be suspicious and offered to go inside and retrieve the TV's documentation. The police decided they would rather handcuff Robinson and put him up against a wall.


Later, officers entered Robinson's home and searched for the documents themselves. Though they apologized once they found the receipts, Robinson believes the entire incident could have been avoided if the officer had trusted him the same way he might have trusted a white person:

If I'd been a white man, you know that wouldn't happen. I'm being handcuffed right here on my own damn property.



The officer would later explain to Robinson why he had taken the drastic measures: a string of robberies had hit the town. This reasoning did only a little to assuage Robinson's unease:

It's real uncomfortable, but I understand.

Several days after the encounter, Robinson filed a complaint with the police department. He believes he was treated wrongly and told the Star that, in this country, black men are "guilty until proven innocent:"

They're thinking I'm stealing. I've been hearing this for 40 years — getting pulled years, getting pulled over, being searched. I'm not going to let this go.


Tonganoxie Police Chief Greg Lawson defended his officer's actions, saying he was alone at the time and acted appropriately since he suspected a burglary:

If I were on that call, by myself, no matter the race of the person, they would've been handcuffed.

Twitter is a little skeptical of Lawson's claim:






At the end of the day, there's only one thing Robinson was guilty of:

Hopefully the department will take his complaint seriously.

H/T - The Hill, YouTube

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Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

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The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
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A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

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