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Warning: This article contains spoilers for those who haven't watched the "Game of Thrones" series finale.

Winter came and Game of Thrones finished its run in a season that captivated audiences as fans waited to see how everything was going to play out.

But when the finale episode aired on Sunday, fans were divided over the fantasy drama series' shocking ending.

You can't please everybody. But actor Jason Alexander knows a thing or two about capping off a series and its repercussions with devoted audiences.


Alexander, who played George Costanza in the sitcom, Seinfeld (1989–1998), reminded the GoT cast about gratitude.

"Dear #GOT company, I know a little something about finales and disappointed fans. My advice: live in joy that you are part of something that moves people so. You were all magnificent. My family and I loved it all. Thanks."


Seinfeld fans were quick to tell the actor how much they enjoyed his show's finale, which at the time was the fourth most watched regular series finale in the history of U.S. television behind M*A*S*H, Cheers and The Fugitive, with an estimated estimated at 76.3 million viewers.






Fans and critics were very divided about how GoT concluded. Lucy Mangan from The Guardian wrote:

"There's no doubt this season has been a rushed business."

Over a million disappointed viewers signed a petition calling for the eighth season to be remade with "competent writers."

One Twitter user mentioned that fan reactions are a good indicator of a show's popularity.


Even the Seinfeld finale wasn't entirely a home run.






May the GoT cast recover from the despair of mixed reviews.



You can't please everybody. But for the record there were those who enjoyed both series finales.



Onward and upward. Few shows can polarize a global audience the way GoT has. That's already a huge win, right?

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