JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
@Incunabula/Twitter

How do you take your air?

Unpolluted and crisp? You got it.

Canned? Mmm-kay.


The winds of change are about to sweep through the land of the rising sun with the crowning of a new emperor.

To commemorate, a company in Japan is selling the preserved air from the Heisei era, which signifies the 30-year reign of the abdicating Emperor Akihito.

The canned "Air of Heisei" hit store shelves on Monday in the Seki, Gifu Prefecture.

Each can is priced at 1,080 yen ($9.60), and producers are hoping to sell as many as 1,000 units, according to Inquirer.


The Japanese are notorious for capitalizing on special occasions at every opportunity with limited edition merchandise for demanding consumers always wanting a keepsake.

In Japan, if you don't have a tangible souvenir of an event, it may as well have never existed.



The canned air will exist as a reminder of a bygone era if you're lucky enough to snag one at a roadside shop or online.

The manufacturing company is located in Seki's "Henari" neighborhood, which is coincidentally written in the same Japanese character as "Heisei" (平成).



The company's president Minoru Inamoto told Agence France-Presse:

"Air is free of charge, but we hope people will enjoy breathing the fresh air of Heisei after the new era comes, or just keep it as a memento."

Okay, so you're really paying for the packaging.

At least it will look swell in your pantry whenever you're feeling nostalgic.




The commemorative can is Henari's way of ushering in a new dawn while expressing gratitude for the departing era with a five-yen coin, called "goen," inserted inside the can to resemble good luck.



Other companies are hoping to cash in by producing toys and other souvenirs as Emperor Akihito's eldest son Naruhito ascends to the throne on May 1, heralding in the "Reiwa" era.




Tokyo department stores can barely keep the popular gold oval coins engraved with Heisei stocked on their shelves. Confectionery stores are also getting in on the action by bringing back sweets made popular from the era.

The Reiwa era is being welcomed with exclusively labeled merchandise such as stickers, smartphone covers, T-shirts, pins and commemorative bottles of the Japanese tipple, sake.

Selling preserved air is not a new concept in Japan. Location-specific merchandise includes canned air in tourist spots like Mt. Fuji.


Some mocked the wacky souvenirs, but then admitted they would purchase the air from other eras, including the Showa period (December 25, 1926, to January 7, 1989) and the Taisho period (30 July 1912, to 25 December 1926).



While the gimmick may seem outrageous, you can't say the Japanese are not creative.

Their imagination cannot be contained; however, the air from the past can be.

Image by doodlartdotcom from Pixabay

I have a paralyzing fear of death. If I could I would live forever. Have you ever seen the movie "Death Becomes Her?" I would give every penny for that potion. And I wouldn't be all crazy like them.

Live well forever and be happy? It's possible. Even though life is nuts and scary, you're still here. What if there is nothing after the final breath? I don't want to just not exist, while everybody else just gets to keep on dancing.

In my hopes I see a Heaven with ice cream and vodka. So I'm going to hold onto that until eternal life is an option. Let's hear from the gallery...

Redditor u/St3fan34 wanted to discuss life after life, by asking:

What do you think really happens after death?
Keep reading... Show less

The pressure to fit in when you're a young person is no joke. It seems like, daily, your emotional and physical safety hinges on you passing as "cool"--whatever that means. "Cool" can mean different things for different people. But when it comes to the things the "popular" kids think is cool--it might actually be destructive or dangerous.

But thankfully, just like trends, what is "cool" and what is not is also liable to change with time. And as generations move on and on, the landscape of what is "cool" changes. Some of the awful things that were cool when we were younger are no longer cool.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Tú Anh from Pixabay

Nobody wants to die alone. That is one of life's more basic truths. We all hope there is going to be a familiar hand to hold and a pair of eyes that witnessed our lives looking into us as we drift off to meet our maker. That feels like the basics of marriage. Well that and a permanent booty call.

That's why a lot of people turn to a trusted friend to maybe one day be a love interest. It's always good to have a fail-safe and a back up. And the older you get the more the chase becomes too much run through, so why not make it easy? It's like... "hey so and so... you wanna get hitched by this date, in case?"

BAM! Instant I Do.

Redditor u/shansnewone wanted the betrothed out there to tell us about their relationship successes and fails, by asking:

Couples who got married on the basis: "if we're both not married by (x) years old, we'll marry each other" how did things work out?
Keep reading... Show less
Shamim Nakhaei/Unsplash

Romance novels, romantic films and TV shows, advertisements, and society at large has made the gift of flowers a symbol of love, condolences, well wishes, or congratulations.

The actual act of giving flowers goes back centuries to ancient Greece, China, Egypt, the Victorian Era, and has evolved even in the last 100 years. In 1917, advertisers made giving flowers to mothers and grandmothers on Mother's Day a staple of the holiday.

Different eras and cultures have changed the way we view the importance of flowers or even the meaning behind the type of flower we are gifting. It shifted to become a gendered gesture most prodominantly in the Victorian Era as a way to express specific feelings for a romantic partner because it wasn't acceptable to share emotions outwardly.

Keep reading... Show less