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A Missouri woman's day was made when she found a heartwarming note and a $5 bill slipped into a book she bought, now she is passing that good will on to others.


"Remember that you are loved, you are amazing, you are strong," read the note found by Ashley Jost of Columbia, Missouri.

Jost was out shopping at Target when Girl, Stop Apologizing: A Shame-Free Plan for Embracing and Achieving Your Goals by Rachel Hollis happened to catch her eye.

As part of a challenge with friends Jost had agreed to read at least 10 pages a day for 75 days.

"I keep hearing this book is an easy read and kind of inspirational," Jost said. "So I thought okay, 17 bucks, I'll just grab this book and it'll be my first read of this challenge."

But once Jost got home she was in for a surprise:


Jost read a chapter of the book. When she finished the chapter and tossed the book on the ottoman, something slipped out of it.

"Five dollars fell out, and it took me a second," said Jost "I was like, 'Wait, what just happened?'"

Jost examined the rest of the book and discovered a pink Post-it note wedged in between one of the last pages.

"To the person who buys this book: I am having a tough day. I thought maybe I could brighten someone else's with this little surprise," the note read. "Go buy a coffee, a donut or a face mask. Practice some self care today. Remember that you are loved, you are amazing, you are strong.

- Lisa"

"I read it once, and I read it again," Jost said. "I thought, 'dang this is really neat'"

Jost couldn't believe what she had found.

"Like this is something that only happens to strangers on the internet, not some random person in the middle of Missouri who just happens to decide in the heat of the moment to buy this book at Target."

So Jost decided to share the random act of kindness with others, posting the note and the story on Twitter.

Jost wasn't the only one touched by the heartwarming gesture and soon the story began spreading across the internet.








Although Jost said she was surprised by the all the response the story has received she think it shows a little kindness is something "we all need."

"I think the engagement is an indicator that people just sort of need the pick-me-up. We need it all the time, but particularly we do heading into the work week and in this busy time of year for everybody."

So Jost has decided to pass the good will she received onto others by paying it forward.

"We live in a college town where there are so many people living paycheck to paycheck," said Jost "So I decided I wanted to do one random act of kindness every day this week, each worth $5."

And others inspired by the random act of kindness are following Jost's example.





And although she may never get to do it in person Jost and others wanted to say thank you to the mysterious Lisa for her kind gesture, "where ever she is."





Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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