Maine Restaurant Will Get Lobsters High Off Marijuana As 'More Humane' Way Of Killing Them

More than one seafood lover has hesitated before ordering lobster after seeing the crustaceans walking around the tank at the front of the restaurant. Taking any animal's life can seem cruel, even if it's for the food we need to survive, but displaying live lobsters and then tossing them into boiling water is a bit extreme. Charlotte Gill, owner of Charlotte's Legendary Lobster Pound in Southwest Harbor, has found a way to make her lobsters' last moments as pleasant as they can be: some high-quality bud.


Gill told the Mount Desert Islander:
I feel bad that when lobsters come here there is no exit strategy. It's a unique place and you get to do such unique things but at the expense of this little creature. I've really been trying to figure out how to make it better

Gill came up with a plan that was she tested on Roscoe, a lobster who looked like he could use some relaxation. Gill placed Roscoe in a box with a couple inches of water at the bottom and then blew marijuana smoke up through the water into the container.

Gill observed Roscoe's behavior for the next several weeks, and found the lobster was significantly more mellow. Even without claw restrainers, Roscoe didn't try to attack any of the other lobsters and was much calmer in general.

Following the success of her experiment, Gill set up an outdoor sedation chamber where she can calm lobsters with THC-infused smoke. She plans on someday building a larger tank so she can get multiple crustaceans high at the same time.

Gill commented:

The animal is already going to be killed. It is far more humane to make it a kinder passage.

Twitter wasn't sure how to feel about the "baked" lobsters:





If you're worried you might get high eating a lobster (something we ALL worry about), Gill says you have nothing to fear: the cooking process should destroy any residual traces of the drug.

THC breaks down completely by 392 degrees, therefore we will use both steam as well as a heat process that will expose the meat to 420 degree extended temperature, in order to ensure there is no possibility of carryover effect (even though the likelihood of such would be literally impossible).


Just to make things 100% clear, she also stated:

I'm not selling an edible.

Gill released Roscoe into the sea as a way of saying "thank you" for being her test subject. He has most likely already developed a reputation for being the chillest lobster in the wild.

H/T - Fox News, Eater

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