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The Earth is a splendid, vast and quixotic mystery. We as the Earth's humble inhabitants know next to nothing about her in the grand scheme of it all. Even those who study this planet as their source of career will tell you they only will ever chip away at the surface of what's happening. Somethings we may find fascinating to know, others... we could probably do without being aware of.

Redditor u/Sickzaur reached out to uncover some Earthly facts, asking... Geologists, geographers, and other Earth enthusiasts, what are some weird things about Earth that most people don't know?


Take me to the Sahara... 

Scientist didn't know how the Amazon forest got enough phosphor to stay fertile. It turns out it gets it from the Sahara desert. The phosphor travels the Atlantic ocean and a great part of the South American continent to keep the forest alive.

lthomazini

Roots run deep... 

You know how icebergs are mostly under the water?

Mountains work the same way. They have roots that go deep into the mantle. Scientists noticed this when they were measuring the gravity and it wasn't what they predicted.

Commonsbisa

Follow the map! 

On a map, most people think the Netherlands and France don't border.

But they do, in the Caribbean.

StrawoftheMonkey

San Andreas so easy...

The San Andreas Fault can't produce tsunamis despite what movies with the Rock may tell you.

The SA Fault is a transform fault which can only move laterally and is not capable of vertical displacement like a subduction zone fault would be able to. Subduction zones make up much of the Pacific Ring of Fire. The San Andreas Fault is not capable of producing an earthquake more powerful than an 8.0 on the Moment Magnitude scale. So an earthquake such as the Tohuku or Indian Ocean (9.0+) is not possible according to earthquake scientists.

AngriestManinWestTX

Not a girl's best friend. 

Diamonds aren't forever, if you want a gem that will truly last forever look into zircons. Zircons are the honeybadgers of the gem world, they simply don't give a crap. They're hardy little gems, that can undergo multiple orogenic cycles and still maintain their original crystal lattice structures. Very helpful in dating very very old rocks.

Source: am geophysicist.

djk94

I prefer the Atlantic... 

The Pacific ocean is so huge it contains pairs of antipodes (points that are directly opposite each other).

spartanburt

Kiss the rain down in Africa... 

It's probably more common to know this now, but Africa is waaaaaaaaaay bigger than it looks on most maps. The Mercator projection map is the one that most people are familiar with, and it vastly under represents the size of some areas of the world, while making others look a lot bigger. Russia is much smaller than it looks on a map, and Africa is monstrously big when you really look at it.

This picture shows a bunch of different countries in relation to Africa's true size.

PopeliusJones

View from the top... 

A "tel" (like in Tel Aviv). is a hill that's not just a hill. It's a hill made from human garbage, built up over millennia. So there was once a village, and as it grew, houses were built on the rubble of old houses. Garbage pits (for ceramic and stuff) were filled in and built upon. This happened so many times over centuries, that hills developed. It's sort of amazing to think of a big hill, with a city on it, and if you dug straight down from the top of that hill, you'd hit layer upon layer of former civilizations.

Mapper9

The Humans... 

Here's an interesting way to think about the Earth's history: look at the geologic time scale and stretch your arms out to your sides away form each other. Your left fingers represent the formation of the Earth. The entire "Precambrian" (or Proterozoic & Archean Eons) represent everything in between your left finger tips to your right wrist. That's 89% of the entire history of the Earth, a time when life didn't exist or was rather primitive. Then, life diversified like crazy starting from your right wrist to the base of your fingers (aka the Paleozoic Era). Then, the Mesozoic Era, or the age of dinosaurs, was across the first two segments of your fingers. Then, the Cenozoic Era, or the age of mammals (aka today), is the last third segment of your finger. Humanity is the very tip of your right fingernail and can be erased by one swipe of a nail file.

BrakeTime

No gold for you! 

Mining geologist here. That many gold mines have no visible gold.

Verystormy

REDDIT

Image by kamalpreet singh from Pixabay

Well that was a close call. That is everyone's main life mantra. If you really think about it, you'll know it to be true. Everyday we live, is another day we've survived, and death isn't the only thing we frequently sidestep. I have lost track of the amount of times my heart has almost gotten me into trouble. If I had been able to be with the people I thought I wanted in the past, I'd be in a mental ward right about now. Dodging a bullet doesn't even begin to cover it.

Redditor u/Not-an-Ocelot wanted to hear about the times that have made people give some extra thanks by asking... What's the biggest bullet you've ever dodged?
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When your time is up, your time is up. And when we march off into the afterlife it feels like everyone wants one of two or two things. People want to go out in a blaze of glory and/or in peace and without pain. I don't know if both is possible but I'll choose option two please. What I know for sure is I definitely don't want to be smoted by a stupid death. Like, Lord, please don't let me die choking on fried chicken and an XL frozen Appletini at the Dallas BBQ because I was laughing to hard at my own jokes. Please.

Redditor u/BlueD_ wanted everyone to fess up about the times they almost met their maker in a less than dignified manner by asking... What's the dumbest way you almost died?
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We may not know it, but sometimes things that seem routine or are just one of our personal habits can really hold back our lives.

One little change to cut those things, or to include new things, can really change the quality of our lives for the better. We have to be willing to drop old routines, which is hard and scary; and we need to be willing to accept new ideas into our space, which is also hard and scary.

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Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

The photographers, DJs, officiates, and planners of the wedding industry hold a unique perspective.

They get to witness the lead-up to the couple's important, deeply symbolic day. Sitting at the table in that context offers those industry professionals a glimpse of the mundane dynamics of couples before the big event.

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