JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Amy E. Price/Getty Images for SXSW // HBO // @mattyglesias/Twitter

Elizabeth Warren watches Game of Thrones, a show which is probably a sweet escape for her considering what's going on in American politics right now.


Oh, and she's team Daenerys Targaryen all the way, as she outlined in a piece for New York Magazine ahead of the eighth season's second episode:

"A queen who declares that she doesn't serve the interests of the rich and powerful? A ruler who doesn't want to control the political system but to break the system as it is known? It's no wonder that the people she meets in Westeros are skeptical."

Warren also had a lot to say about Cersei of House Lannister, writing that the world needs "less" of people like her, a statement about power and economy:

"Unlike Dany, Cersei doesn't expect to win with the people — she expects to win in spite of them. When Cersei's brother (and lover) Jaime begs her not to wage a war — arguing that they don't have the warrior strength of the Dothraki or the allegiance of the other houses, she replies with all the confidence in the Seven Kingdoms: 'We have something better. We have the Iron Bank'."
"Rather than earn her army, Cersei's pays for it. She buys 20,000 Golden Company mercenaries — though they arrive without their legendary elephants — with funds from the Iron Bank. But Cersei has no intention of sending her private army north to help defeat the army of the dead — that's Jon and Dany's problem."
"No, Cersei's army will sit back and wait for whatever comes their way. Cersei's betting on the strength of the bank to get her through the biggest fight of her life. It never crosses the mind that the bank could fail, or betray her."

That's a loaded statement and it suits Warren perfectly.

She is running on a platform that focuses on monitoring and regulating big banks, institutions she's criticized for years. And people loved it.






And the answer to this is up in the air, but we figure she might be able to do it without an army of elephants.

You can't say Warren's been inconsistent. She's making headlines today for her proposal to cancel student debt and eliminate tuition.

"This touches people's lives," Warren said in an interview with The New York Times.

"This is a chance to talk about what's broken and how we fix it. This is the American dream."

More to come as her campaign heats up.

Image by Steve Buissinne from Pixabay

Y'all know that one Hannah Montana song? “Everybody makes mistakes! Everybody has those days!" That's the song I sing to myself every time I accidentally burn myself while making ramen. It comforts me to know, however, that there are a lot of worse mistakes out there than some spilled ramen. Who knew?

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Daniel Perrig from Pixabay

When I was younger, it seemed every adult believed that you couldn't swim for several hours after eating. Why did they all believe this? I fought them on this all the time, by the way. I shouldn't have had to, just because I'd eaten some barbecue during a pool party. Guess what, though? That belief is unfounded.

Keep reading... Show less

As much as we're not supposed to feel satisfaction upon observing the struggles of other people, it can be hard to resist a silent, internal fist pump when some blunder occurs immediately after we tried to help the person prevent it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by leo2014 from Pixabay

One of the most upsetting aspects of the Covid-19 pandemic––which is saying a lot, frankly––is the number of people who have been so affected by misinformation and disinformation. You know the ones to which I refer: These are the people who are convinced the virus is a hoax despite the lives it's claimed and the devastation it has wrought on society at large. Disinformation kills––there are stories of people who remained convinced that Covid-19 is a hoax even while intubated in the ICU, even up to their last breath.

After Redditor asked the online community, "Doctors of Reddit, what happened when you diagnosed a Covid-19 denier with Covid-19?" doctors and other medical professionals shared these rather unsettling stories.

Keep reading... Show less