It's not just the prospect of having to abide by draconian dress codes that has students up in arms. Their teachers and other authority figures have also been guilty of implementing some rather ridiculous rules. Who likes those?

Thanks to Redditor ItStillIsntLupus, who asked the online community, "What was your school's dumbest rule?" we learned that our schools might have actually ranked much lower on the dumb scale. What were these schools even thinking?!


"You could use the drinking fountain..."

No water. You could use the drinking fountain once per day. I think they didn't want people going to the bathroom all the time, but the school didn't have any air conditioning either so kids always ended up in the nurse's office.

Repulsive-Divide

"The district board..."

Giphy

They banned us from playing Uno. The district board literally banned us from playing a card game during lunch because it 'promotes gambling'. We tried to play during lunch last semester and we were almost expelled.

'We don't know you're not gambling.'

'I don't have money to afford lunch what makes you think I have money to gamble away on an Uno game?'

We have to file a request with the deans ahead of time in order to play, that is, if they even say yes.

sad_noodless

"My high school had a rule..."

My high school had a rule that no group of people could wear matching outfits or it was gang related (except for the high school sports team exemption). So a bunch of us got together and started wearing suits and claiming to be in a gang with the principal to try and get him suspended.

JBeatnik

"For a brief period..."

For a brief period of time, we couldn't roll up our sleeves if wearing a long sleeve shirt because that's where the drug dealers hide the marijuana cigarettes apparently (mid 90s).

noguarde

"If someone ever hit you..."

If someone ever hit you, BOTH you and the attacker would get suspended. Extra suspension if you tried to defend yourself, but even if you did nothing then you would still be punished for "being involved in a fight".

pawpaw-prickly-pear

"Our school is supposed to fit..."

My school briefly banned bags from being in the classrooms- so people who didn't use their lockers or have keys (which were quite a few hundred people considering our lockers were VERY small) had to put their bags in the hallways.

This became a problem fairly quickly.

Our school is supposed to fit over 3000-ish people but the time I was there it was beginning to overfill, which meant the hallways would be quite a pain to get through. You could probably guess what happens next, people tripping over bags left and right and teachers didn't even realise that if a fire were to start that all of these bags would be in the way and be a huge hazard.

This rule only lasted a few months.

Lqvii

"Can't ride a different bus..."

Can't ride a different bus to go home with someone else unless it's an emergency.

Have to provide 3 days notice for emergencies.

IaniteThePirate

"The shop used to sell..."

Collecting erasers with flags on them. The shop used to sell these small erasers with country's flag printed on them. The boys started collecting them and playing some domino like game with it. Soon after it got popular the faculty banned buying of flag erasers.

TheDoorDoesntWork

"At my old high school..."

At my old high school girls weren't allowed to wear tank tops/show our shoulders.. it was part of the dress code - deemed to be too "distracting" to others.

oliviaxclaire

"I was in the nurse's office one day..."

I was in the nurse's office one day when my period was particularly gruesome, pale as a ghost and unsteady on my feet, but I couldn't be sent home because I didn't have a fever and I hadn't thrown up.

GrayKitty98

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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