Dubai Is Now Testing Police Hoverbikes—And The Future Is Officially Here 😮

Dubai Is Now Testing Police Hoverbikes—And The Future Is Officially Here 😮
YouTube: HOVERSURF OFFICIAL

The dream of the cyberpunk future of the '90s is coming true in Dubai. The country is testing hoverbikes for their police force.

Police crews have begun training officers to ride the Hoversurf S3 2019, a vertical takeoff craft that functions much like a larger R/C drone you can buy at an electronics store.

With a maximum altitude of 16 feet and only about 20 minutes of battery life, don't expect to be pulled over for speeding by an officer on this vehicle. Rather, it's expected to be used for emergency scenarios to allow officers to reach difficult areas.

The craft weighs 253 pounds, which sounds like a lot but, for a personal sized aircraft, is fairly light. The device does have a drone mode, allowing it to be flown remotely.

It's an exciting time to be living in the future.



The police force has just one hoverbike at the moment and is in the process of training two crews to ride the craft, Hoversurf claims it's prepared to produce 40 hoverbikes if Dubai requests them. At $150,000 a piece, the bike is a very expensive piece of rescue equipment, but one that is available to private citizens as well. Hoversurf's product meets U.S. Federal Aviation and Administration requirements, which means you don't need a pilot's license to own and operate one.

Some weren't sure of the practicality of such a device.




This isn't the only personal hovercraft on the market. It joins other vertical takeoff vehicles like Kitty Hawk's Flyer and Malloy Aeronautic's hoverbike in the race to provide personal low-altitude flying experiences.

Dubai is known for the sometimes extreme and expensive solutions for their law enforcement. They've also purchased expensive sports cars like a Lamborghini, a Ferrarri, and a Bugatti to try and connect with the populace.

H/T: Mashable, CNN

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