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Model Squad is a new program on E! which follows the lives of nine NYC fashion models as they attempt to navigate the industry, as well as their personal lives. On a recent episode, model Shanina Shaik spoke about how hard it was being a woman of color and breaking into the industry. When another model commented that their white colleagues would have trouble relating to what it's like, white model Devon Windsor insisted she'd seen similar hardships:

I literally f***ing went through hell, and literally lived in different countries like every other month, and didn't speak that language, didn't speak Paris, didn't speak Italian. And I did that for like two years.

Shaik began the conversation by speaking about the discrimination all women of color face while trying to become models:

I used to get bullied. Because of my skin color, I wasn't gonna be able to do high fashion. A lot of black girls would have to miss Milan [Fashion Week] because they weren't able to walk in the shows because they don't want girls of that color.


Multiple times, model Ping Hue tried to communicate to her white colleagues that they weren't familiar with the same kind of struggles women of color had to face, but Windsor insisted she had things just as hard:

Do you know how hard it is to be blonde? I have to get a highlight every month.


Rachel Elizabeth Cargle wrote about scenarios just like this one in The Toxic White Feminism Playbook, in which Windsor's behavior is referred to as "Centering:"

White women get so caught up in how they feel in a moment of black women expressing themselves that they completely vacuum the energy, direction, and point of the conversation to themselves and their feelings. They start to explain why race is hard for them to talk about, what they think would be a better solution to the topic at hand, and perhaps what women of color can do to make it more palatable.


On Twitter, the backlash against Windsor was immediate:

Clearly, if you're comparing systemic racism to your highlights, you've taken a wrong turn somewhere.

Windsor was mocked mercilessly from all sides...



It never looks good, when hearing about someone else's struggle, to insist you have it worse...especially when you clearly didn't.

Windsor later took to Twitter to apologize, while also insisting the scene was heavily edited to make her comments look worse than they actually were.

Fellow model from the show, Olivia Culpo, backed up Windsor and showed her support.

It's hard to know which parts of the conversation were edited and which weren't, but one lesson we've learned is that when a person of color is telling you their experience with racism, it's not an invitation to try and one-up them.

Hopefully, Devon Windosr learned this lesson well.

H/T - Buzzfeed, Revelist

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

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Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
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Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

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Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

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