If you're ever wondering whether you should dress up as a Nazi, just don't. The times when dressing as a Nazi is acceptable are, well, never. It's also never ok to dress up your five-year-old son as Hitler. That should go without saying, but of course, it's not.


Continuing humanity's yearly trend of dressing in tasteless and offensive costumes around Halloween, a picture of Bryant Goldbach of Kentucky dressed as a Nazi and his son dressed as Adolf Hitler sparked outrage online.

Goldbach claims the costume was originally meant to be historical, but quickly found himself doubting his decision when called out by several party-goers at a local trick-or-trunk party. Just after the party, Goldbach posted to Facebook defending the outfit:


Tristate

Photos of Goldbach and his son prompted social media users to track down his Facebook, where they found many other examples of racism and memes which many would classify as examples of alt-right propaganda.





However, Goldbach would later comment that he regretted the costume:

I think it was in bad taste for me to let my child to wear that, probably for me to wear that. It didn't occur to me. I thought it was a bad decision on my part.

A social media user summer up many people's feelings against the costume:

With all the hate in the world, it's bringing out more hate from the past. It's showing things that shouldn't be, not necessarily brought up, but romanticized.

Twitter wasn't buying Goldbach's apology:









Prominent Rabbi Gary Mazo had this to say on the subject of dressing up as holocaust-related figures on Halloween:

A good rule of thumb would be: if your costume calls to mind an event where millions were killed, choose another costume. If the purpose of Halloween is to have fun - bigotry, anti-Semitism and racism are not fun. That should be common sense.



Ultimately, however, Rabbi Mazo is glad Goldbach apologized, saying:

The fact that the father apologized is important; the fact he did not know the costumes would be offensive is a very sad reflection on our society.



H/T - Indy 100, Tristate

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