JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Mark Garlick/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

If you're lucky, when you go to look at the night sky this weekend, you'll see a new bluish light. Except it's not new; it's been around for millennia and was discovered by humans in 1948. It's 46P/Wirtanen, better known as the "Christmas Comet."




The comet is on approach and potentially visible to the naked eye if you live in a low light-pollution area. When the comet reaches its closest pass of Earth, it may even be visible from some cities, but you'll definitely want a telescope to get the best look before the 16th.

Many are trying to catch a glimpse of the comet.






It may not be much more than a fuzzy patch of light depending on the day and your location. It will not have a tail, as many are used to seeing with comets. If you're having trouble, even a simple pair of binoculars can assist. Unfortunately, the night it will be closest, we're expected to have a bright moon, but it should set around 1:00 a.m. EST.

It's a stellar looking interstellar event!





The comet was discovered in 1948 by Carl A. Wirtanen. It took more than a year to be able to confirm it as a short-period comet. Every five years, the comet makes a pass by Earth, but it's often too far away to be seen without a telescope. And that's what makes this year's event all the more special. The comet won't be this close for another 20 years.

It's important to get the right information on how to view it.





To spot the comet in North America, look to the southern sky, near the Pleiades star cluster. If you decide to look on the 13th or 14th, you can also catch the Geminid meteor shower.

And try not to mistake it for a man known for wearing red up in the night sky.







While these astronomical events are recorded and reliable, they're also rare for the average person. It might be worth it to find a warm sleeping bag, some good company, and spend a very late night or very early morning watching some space rocks.

H/T: CBC News, Australian Broadcasting Corp News

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

Why do people fall for them? Well some research has looked into the reasons for that.

The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

"This research suggests that people may be drawn to conspiracy theories when—compared with nonconspiracy explanations—they promise to satisfy important social psychological motives that can be characterized as epistemic (e.g., the desire for understanding, accuracy, and subjective certainty), existential (e.g., the desire for control and security), and social (e.g., the desire to maintain a positive image of the self or group)."

Whatever the motivations may be, we wanted to know which convoluted stories became apart of peoples consciousness enough for them to believe it.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Enrique Meseguer from Pixabay

I hate ghosts, even if it's Casper. My life is already stressful enough. I don't need to creeped out by spirits from the beyond. Shouldn't they be resting and basking in the glow of the great beyond instead of menacing the rest of us?

The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

Redditor u/Murky-Increase4705 wanted to hear about all the times we've faced some hauntings that left us shook, by asking:

Reddit, what are your creepy encounters with something that you are convinced was paranormal?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

The past year brought about much anxiety and it's been a challenge to find the light in what has felt like perpetual darkness.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Gabriela Sanda from Pixabay

A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

Not necessarily with women front and center as part of the conversation, unfortunately.

Keep reading... Show less