(CBP)

A U.S. Customs and Border Protections K-9 unit sniffed out a major find at Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (ATL) on Thursday.

The Agriculture Detector dog, a beagle named "Hardy," found a cooked pig's head in a passenger's checked luggage arriving from Ecuador.

In the press release photo, Hardy looks rather pleased with himself — and a bit hungry — as he peeks from behind the discovery.


But Hardy, being a pro, knows he must surrender the pork for the greater good of the country.


The pig's head was confiscated and thrown away, much to the chagrin of the drooling doggo who was hoping for a bite of the discovery.

All pork products are strictly forbidden access into the U.S., regardless of their country origin, as pork can potentially spread foreign diseases such as foot and mouth disease and swine fever.

Carey Davis, CBP Area Port Director for the Port of Atlanta elaborated on disease prevention:

"Our best defense against destructive pests and animal diseases is to prevent the entry of prohibited agriculture products from entering the United States."


According to the CBP website all agricultural products entering the country are also subject to inspection by CBP agriculture specialists or CBP officers.

The specialists have extensive knowledge and training of biological sciences and agricultural inspection.

Over one million people, in addition to air and sea cargo, enter the country every day and are subject to inspection.

Unfortunately for Hardy, he didn't get his just desserts. But the beagle sure did an excellent job!


Hardy began working at ATL, known as one of the busiest travel hubs in the world, in 2015.

He was trained at the U.S. Department of Agriculture at their National Detectors Dog Training Center in Newnan, GA, and has been protecting our country against harmful diseases, one sniff at a time.

At the very least, they can give the dog a bone.

H/T - CBP, Twitter, Insider

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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