Streeter Lecka/Getty Images, @Complex/Twitter

Barack Obama was never a fashionista. His oft-teased tan suit controversy while he resided in the Oval Office confirms this. But nowadays, mired in the kinds of scandals our current administration likes to plunge us into, we look back on that kind of that non-scandal with fondness and nostalgia.

Recently, however, our former POTUS sported a different look, and it's a sartorial win that the media can't stop obsessing over.

On February 20th, Obama showed up for a hyped college basketball game at the Cameron Indoor Stadium in North Carolina to watch the North Carolina Tar Heels play the Duke Blue Devils. But people were commenting on more than his presence.

He was rocking a custom-made Rag & Bone black bomber jacket, and the embroidery on his sleeve in particular tied his look together perfectly, like a boss.


The white stitching on his new swag was the number "44," which refers to his standing as our 44th president. Sigh.




It's safe to say we've moved well past the tan-suit incident.






Yes, his sleek outerwear exuding the coolness of the man himself not only impressed Twitter, but made everyone nostalgic for a different era.








A new nickname was born.


He is sorely missed.




This user suggested a similar wardrobe upgrade for the sitting president, albeit with a different color.



If you've got $595 burning a hole in your wallet, you too could be the proud owner of this Manston Jacket and you can add your own defining digits embroidered on your sleeve.

Rag & Bone founder Marcus Wainwright woke up to a slew of texts, including one from head of marketing, after the internet's explosive glee over the bomber.

"Fun to wake up to that. He looked pretty f****** cool."

The brand customized the jacket for the former president towards the end of his second term, but the fashion CEO didn't expect Obama to be seen in public wearing it.

"I hadn't forgotten about it, but I wasn't necessarily waiting [for it to appear]," Wainwright told GQ.

"I wasn't expecting him to wear it in public. I thought maybe he's wearing it on the weekends or at home. I was hoping that he was wearing it."

He also commented on the personalized embroidery.

"The '44' on the sleeve just felt like a subtle touch. Not many people could have pulled it off that way. He's got style."

We concur and can say with absolute certainty that our former POTUS looked haute.

Harry Cunningham/Unsplash

You may have heard of the phrase "retail therapy" before, which is the act of buying things for personal enjoyment.

Well, there's some truth to that.

The University of Michigan actually studied the affects of shopping on our sadness levels. Purchasing something you enjoy can actually decrease sadness 40 times better than not purchasing something.

There are tons of other benefits like dopamine increases, anxiety reduction and improved mood. We wanted to know what people are buying to give them that rush of happy hormones and increase their joy.

Keep reading... Show less
Jessica Podraza/Unsplash

When we think of a "hero" we might think of someone in a cape who's saving civilians from terror. Or maybe we think of the essential workers we've called heroes throughout the pandemic.

Heroism is simply defined as "great bravery," according to Oxford Languages.

If being a hero is about showing courage, bravery and strength, heroic feats happen all around us every day with ordinary people.

Keep reading... Show less
Sharon McCutcheon/Unsplash

They say good things come in small packages—as a lifelong member of the "Never hit 5 feet tall" club it's a phrase I've had thrown at me often.

It's right up there with "small but mighty" and "people mcnugget."

It's popular because there's a fair bit of truth to it, though.

When it comes to some things, smaller is just flat out better.

Keep reading... Show less
OSPAN ALI on Unsplash

Everyone has their "type" when it comes to sexual attraction.

It could be a woman's scent, a man's fashion sense, or a confident attitude that really gets a heart fluttering at 100 m.p.h.
However, what someone thinks is "hot" or "sexy" may be a total turn-off for others.
Keep reading... Show less