(Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for March For Our Lives)

David Hogg is the the Parkland, Florida student who survived the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and became one of the nation's leading gun reform activists practically overnight. Hogg was once mocked by Fox News over college rejections, and he has had the last laugh.


Hogg recently took to Twitter to announce that he would be attending Harvard University.


In March, Fox News personality Laura Ingraham, the host of The Ingraham Angle, feuded with Hogg amid a heated national debate about gun reform and mocked him for not getting into several of the colleges to which he applied. At the time, Ingraham cited a Daily Wire story that spotlighted Hogg's college rejection notices.

"David Hogg Rejected by Four Colleges To Which He Applied and whines about it," she wrote, adding that Hogg had been "dinged" by the University of California with a 4.1-grade point average.

Hogg went after Ingraham's advertisers in response.


Ingraham chose to apologize to Hogg shortly after advertisers began dropping her program.



Hogg did not accept Ingraham's apology, however, and her supporters launched the hashtag #IStandWithLaura in response to advertisers who dropped her show.

Many individuals canceled their subscriptions and accounts along with a slew of advertisers, including Expedia, Wayfair, and Office Depot.

Others referred to Hogg as:

  • an "anti-gun communist";
  • a shill for groups funded by business magnate George Soros, who has often been accused of masterminding and funding liberal and progressive movements;
  • a "Lil Hitler pug";
  • a "Hitleresque punk";
  • a "Dem Puppet";
  • a "radical leftist";
  • a "fouled [sic] mouth [sic] teenager."




Hogg stood firm. "I'm not going to stoop to her level and go after her on a personal level," he said at the time. "I'm going to go after her advertisers."

Hogg's announcement that he would attend Harvard came a week after fellow Parkland survivor Jaclyn Corin, a co-founder of the March For Our Lives movement, said she'd also be attending the Ivy League university. We wish them the best.

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