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1. Friendly to the point that you become suspicious of their intent.

2. Americans generally are more confident in the way they present themselves, most other countries tend to be more reserved. Walk into a room full of different nationalities, I guarantee the American person will be the first to introduce themselves. It's a confidence thing, and I admire it.

3. When they use the imperial system.

4. Wearing sneakers with anything

5. Big smiles, firm handshakes

6. Using big adjectives generously ("Wow, your aunt's kidney stones sound awesome!" or "This Euroshopper beer tastes great!")

7. Mostly it's the 'prepared for anything' look they have about them (fanny pack, backpack, bottled water, camera pouch) compared to various other tourists - Asians tend to herd together for safety, while Europeans vary between blend-right-in Scandinavian to designer-brands-everywhere French and traffic-laws-are-for-others Italian. But Americans are the only ones who seem to view a perfectly civilized, modern city like some kind of uncharted jungle that doesn't have places to shelter in the rain or buy cheap bottled water.

8. They say 'great' and are not being sarcastic. I can't even begin to imagine making a sentence where great actually means great.

9. Constant clapping.

10. Being surprised about the topless models on page 3.

11. Speaking as a former barman or "bartender" as American customers would say... tipping! No British person will ever tip a barman. I'll occasionally get bought a drink by drunk ladies or gents, but Brits actually giving me money for doing a job that I was already being paid for? Never happened. I would listen for American accents (which were easy to hear due to their natural loudness) and immediately serve them next.

12. Americans describe distances in driving time, as opposed to miles or kilometers.

13. The dead giveaway is when they call you "honey" or "sweetie" or "darling".

14. North face jackets. Everywhere.

15. Incredibly loud but incredibly friendly. Very often you can hear them before you see them.


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