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Sonny Mead is an Illinois four-year-old suffering from craniosynostosis, a condition which causes a child's skull to fuse together prematurely, stunting brain growth and causing potential damage. Due to an important surgery Sonny will be receiving prior to Halloween night, it seemed for a while like he wouldn't be able to go out and trick-or-treat with the other kids. When the Mead's neighborhood found out about this, however, they made other plans!


Knowing how important trick-or-treating can be to young kids, Sonny's neighborhood stepped up and held an early Halloween night just for him! Long before the actual end of October, Sonny dressed up as Superman, visited 20 houses on a special trick-or-treat route, and took a special Halloween ride in the local firetruck.



Jackie Mead, Sonny's mom, told Fox 2 Now:

He thinks today is Halloween. We let him pick his costume, and up until today he was going to be Spider-Man, and then he decided that he wanted to be Superman because he wants superpowers.



In 2015, Sonny had pieces of his skull removed so his brain would have room to grow. Those pieces were supposed to grow back over time, but doctors were dismayed to find that they weren't doing so. Doctors will now be performing a procedure to rebuild Sonny's skull using "a 3-D printer and bone from a cadaver."




The four-year-old is expected to be in recovery from two to six months, so making a nice Halloween memory before going into surgery could be far more helpful than even his kind neighbors realize.


Twitter was inspired by the kind-hearted Illinois neighborhood:









Fortuately, Amanda Richert, a neighbor and friend of Sonny's family, wasn't about to let a Halloween go uncelebrated!

He wasn't going to be able to trick-or-treat, and I just, as a mom, could not let that happen.



H/T - New York Post, People

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