When Nike made former 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick the face of their new ad campaign, alongside the slogan "Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything," the company was counting on conservatives everywhere to turn the decision into a controversy. Conservatives didn't disappoint—before long, many on social media were burning their Nike products and claiming they'd never buy the brand again. These protests seem to have played right into Nike's hand, however: initial reports suggest shoe sales have seen a dramatic increase since the ad premiered.


It seems supporting Colin Kaepernick is both a sound moral choice and a viable economic one. Edison Trends, a digital commerce research company, reported that:

Nike sales grew 31% from Sunday through Tuesday over Labor Day this year, besting 2017's comparative 17% increase.



Edison reported that Nike saw the usual dip in sales going into late August, but bounced back much more aggressively than last year after all the free press generated by the Kaepernick controversy.

The brand's visibility was also helped along by President Trump, who's repeatedly insisted football players who kneel to protest police brutality are "disrespecting the anthem, the US flag, and the military."



Kaepernick began kneeling during the national anthem in 2016 to bring awareness to "racial injustice and police brutality." On Tuesday, September 4, the day after Kaepernick's ad was released, Trump commented to the Daily Caller:

I think it's a terrible message that [Nike] are sending and the purpose of them doing it, maybe there's a reason for them doing it. But I think as far as sending a message, I think it's a terrible message and a message that shouldn't be sent. There's no reason for it.

The President also commented on Twitter, suggesting without evidence that Nike's sales had been hurt by their controversial ad:



Other Twitter users seemed eager to call the President out, however:






Edison Trends is fairly sure, after analyzing "anonymised and aggregated e-receipts from more than 3 million consumers," that Nike is thinking their plan to ride a wave of controversy to heightened profits payed off in a big way:

Nike's 2018 late summer sales show much the same trend as last year's, with order volume decreasing slightly going into late August. The similarity decreases coming out of Labor Day weekend, however, with sales seeing a bigger bump on Monday and Tuesday than in the past.




But while Nike is undoubtably partnering with Kaepernick because of his economic value, Kaepernick himself is still motivated by trying to raise awareness of a very real issue. Former NBA legend Kareem Abdul Jabbar wrote in an open letter to NFL owners:

It's been two years since Colin Kaepernick first took a knee to protest systemic racial injustice, especially police brutality, against people of color. The worst thing about that isn't that two years later we're still debating whether players have the right to protest, it's that not much has changed regarding what Kaepernick was protesting.




H/T - The Guardian, Yahoo, Bloomberg

People Describe The Absolute Laziest Things They've Ever Done
Photo by Zhang Kenny on Unsplash

Are we being lazy or is it self-care?

That is what you should ask yourself first, before you judge.

Life is an arduous journey and a constant energy suck.

It was inevitable we'd find shortcuts to get by.

It's all about survival.

Redditor Batman_In_Peacetime wanted to hear about the times we just didn't care enough to try harder. They asked:

"What is a lazy thing you began doing when you realised you can live with it?"
Keep reading... Show less

Be it on a blind date, at a party where you don't know anyone, or sitting next to someone on an airplane, starting a conversation with a total stranger is difficult.

As much as we'd all like to be friendly, far too often we find ourselves at a loss for words.

It doesn't help that we generally have no idea of what these people's various interests are, making it anyone's guess how they'll respond.

But some have this problem solved, finding a go-to topic which is always guaranteed to get a response, no matter who you're talking to.

Redditor Blugged_Bunny was curious to hear what people thought was the best way to begin a conversation with strangers, leading them to ask:

"What is your go-to 'small talk' topic with strangers?"
Keep reading... Show less
People Explain Which Things Are Stupidly Overpriced
Photo by Luis Tosta on Unsplash

Quality comes with price. That's a fact you can't escape. If you hire someone to fix your home, and want them to do the best job, you're going to have to pay above average prices. That's fine. Pay the people what they're worth for the great job they did. However, we live in a world where everyone is looking for their payout, even if what they've given you is less than ideal.

Don't overpay for any of these.

Keep reading... Show less
People Divulge The Opinion That Is The Smallest Hill They're Willing To Die On
Photo by Sung Jin Cho on Unsplash

Not everyone is going to believe what you believe. Our own experiences and values add up to make us who we are. Without them, we'd all be the same amorphous blob of consciousness covering the planet in bland beliefs. You hold something in high regard, and that might mean someone else disagrees with you.

Hold your ground, and be ready to die on that hill, kind of like these people.

Keep reading... Show less