JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

Hope seemed lost for a New Jersey Girl Scout troop after a thief made off with almost $1200 of their money, but after hearing their story New Yorkers stepped up, opening their hearts and their wallets.


Troop 80062 set up their table full of Girl Scout cookies in the Woodbridge Center Mall, selling all the traditional favorites to save up for a group trip to Savannah, Ga to visit the home of Girl Scout founder Juliette Gordon Low.

In a heart-breaking turn of events though, an unidentified thief made off with the envelope containing the nearly $1200 in cash and checks the girls had made selling cookies.

But a group of generous New Yorkers stepped in to save the day, banding together to raise money to send the girls to Georgia.


"We were shocked and devastated," troop leader Jessica Medina, 38 told the New York Post after the January 18 robbery.

"The girls had worked so hard. Everybody was crying."

The thief who approached the table with an elderly woman using a walker first asked the girls for a box of Caramel de Lites and some Peanut Butter Patties before he grabbed the envelope full of cash and checks Medina had put down on the table to help 11-year-old Olivia Limmer with the sale.

"I was behind the table and he reached over it to grab the envelope," Medina told the Post.

"He slipped it in his jacket. He did it very fast — in the blink of an eye"

By the time Medina realized the envelope was gone it was too late. The girls were devastated by the theft.

"I'm pretty angry. It's heartbreaking," said Olivia Limmer.

"You shouldn't steal from anybody, but stealing from Girl Scouts is even worse."

When Medina later posted about the incident on Facebook people were just as upset by the theft as the girls.



Linda Bounanno Berrier/Facebook


Linda M Lacki Lewka/Facebook


Bernice Gilliland/Facebook


Denise Bongiovanni Lagomarsino/Facebook


Judy Keegan/Facebook


After the troop's heartbreaking story went viral, a group of kindhearted New Yorkers decided they weren't just going to sit back and watch.

"I don't want to see any child who works hard not get to fulfill her dreams," said Vince La Padula, one of the many donors who pledged more than $3500 already to fund the troop's trip to Savannah.

Padula, 47, who works in finance, has pledged $2200 for the trip.

"For these kids, their whole year depends on how much money they raise," Padula told the Post.

"I was an Eagle Scout myself. A lot of people grew up as Girl Scouts or Boy Scouts, so I think they can relate."

Padula wasn't the only one moved by the girls story though.

After the story made headlines people began calling into the Post, offering to write checks.

"Me and my partner saw the article and wanted to help out." said one of the generous donors.

"My daughter was a Girl Scout, so this really got to me."

Another donor, Rabbi Anchelle Perl of Mineola, shared his disbelief with the Post when he called in to pledge $250.

"Children should trust in their elders. What kind of message does it send that an adult would come steal from them?"

And the offers of donations didn't stop there. On Facebook, pledges and offers to buy cookies came pouring in.



Yolanda Winfield/Facebook


Jacqueline D Martinez/Facebook


Frank Lehman/Facebook


Krystal Lynn/Facebook


Mick Kless/Facebook


It is hard to imagine the type of person who would steal from a group of Girl Scouts, but thanks to the support of all the generous donors the girls' story had a much sweeter ending.

Image by Mary Pahlke from Pixabay

There are few things more satisfying than a crisp $20 bill. Well, maybe a crisp $100 bill.

But twenty big ones can get you pretty far nonetheless.

Whether it's tucked firmly in a birthday card, passing from hand to hand after a knee-jerk sports bet, or going toward a useful tool, the old twenty dollar bill has been used for countless purposes.


Keep reading... Show less
Image by Jan Vašek from Pixabay

I realize that school safety has been severely compromised and has been under dire scrutiny over the past decade and of course, it should be. And when I was a student, my safety was one of my greatest priorities but, some implemented rules under the guise of "safety" were and are... just plain ludicrous. Like who thinks up some of these ideas?

Redditor u/Animeking1108 wanted to discuss how the education system has ideas that sometimes are just more a pain in the butt than a daily enhancement... What was the dumbest rule your school enforced?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Angelo Esslinger from Pixabay

One of the golden rules of life? Doctors are merely human. They don't know everything and they make mistakes. That is why you always want to get another opinion. Things are constantly missed. That doesn't mean docs don't know what they're doing, they just aren't infallible. So make sure to ask questions, lots of them.

Redditor u/Gorgon_the_Dragon wanted to hear from doctors about why it is imperative we always get second and maybe third opinions by asking... Doctors of Reddit, what was the worse thing you've seen for a patient that another Doctor overlooked?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by nonbirinonko from Pixabay

When we think about learning history, our first thought is usually sitting in our high school history class (or AP World History class if you're a nerd like me) being bored out of our minds. Unless again, you're a huge freaking nerd like me. But I think we all have the memory of the moment where we realized learning about history was kinda cool. And they usually start from one weird fact.

Here are a few examples of turning points in learning about history, straight from the keyboards of the people at AskReddit.

U/Tynoa2 asked: What's your favourite historical fact?


Keep reading... Show less