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So, if you haven't heard, Republicans found a new reason to disparage Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, the young Democratic Socialist congresswoman representing New York's 14th congressional district.


Videos surfaced of Ocasio-Cortez dancing on a rooftop in Boston, the city of her alma mater, Boston University.

However, they neglected to mention one major part of the dance featured in the video.

Does it look familiar to you?

Here is the full video in question:


Phoenix - Lisztomania - Boston University Brat Pack Mashup www.youtube.com

Does the dancing look familiar?

That's because it's a reimagining of the iconic scene from The Breakfast Club where the kids dance all over the library.

Here's the original version from the 1985 John Hughes film that made stars of Anthony Michael Hall, Ally Sheedy, Judd Nelson, Emilio Estevez and Hughes' muse, Molly Ringwald.


The Breakfast Club Dance Scene www.youtube.com

The Breakfast Club celebrated their 30th anniversary in 2015 with a special edition of the film, available here.

So not only was the video completely non-offensive, but according to Uproxx, it was actually created FOR Boston University.

"As it turns out, the video was actually created for Boston University's Howard Thurman Center for Common Ground, which provides 'programs, events and experiences to students designed to encourage creative exchange of ideas, thoughts, beliefs and opinions.'"

Whoops.

Strike three, Republicans.

Ocasio-Cortez struck back by posting a video of her on Capitol Hill....dancing.



It wasn't long before some stars of The Breakfast Club caught on to Ocasio-Cortez's video.

Molly Ringwald and Ally Sheedy both tweeted their support for the Congresswoman's sweet moves.





The tweets from the founding members of The Breakfast Club are inspiring the internet a little today.





After all, is admission into The Breakfast Club ever really closed?





Wow...The Breakfast Club is turning 34 this year.

Does anybody else feel old?







It seems like this attempt on AOC's credibility only made her more popular among both Gen X and Millennials. Sorry, for those of you trying to bring her down.

Manipulation is designed to be stealthy. We hardly recognize it when it's happening to us because our abuser has forced it to appear under wraps.

But when we recognize it for what it really is, we really feel like we've been smacked across the face. There is no other descriptor for it. Usually we've trusted and loved those that manipulated us.

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Image by Anita S. from Pixabay

Just as new mothers encounter the sudden, influential developments of powerful hormone changes, protective instincts, and milk production, so new fathers undergo some key changes of their own.

Their socks become exclusively white, climbing higher up the calf than ever before. All their shorts sprout cargo pockets and clunky belt loop cell phone holders. They start to really lean in to their old records.

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Image by Patricia Srigley from Pixabay

Cleaning up is hard enough when it's just clearing a month of dust bunnies. Can you imagine cleaning the debris left by murder, suicide and violence? I have a really great friend who used to do crime scene clean-up for a living. The pay is incredible; it starts at $55 an hour. But there is a much higher cost in mental well being. Death affects you in ways you don't always feel immediately. My friend has stories of nightmares, depression and pain after leaving scenes of horror. Why make all that money just to spend it on therapy? It takes a certain type of person.

***TRIGGER WARNING. CONTENTS ARE SENSITIVE ***

Redditor u/MemegodDave wanted to hear from the people who have the stomach to come in after crime and tragedy

to try to bring back some form of normalcy to the location by asking... People who make their living out of cleaning murder scenes, accidents and the like, what is the worst thing you have experienced in your career?

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We all know the telltale signs that something is making us uncomfortable. Suddenly, we begin shaking, either in our hands or knees or toes. Then, usually, sweat starts pouring out of every part of our body, making it look like we just ran through a rainstorm underneath a waterfall. Finally, we lose our regular speech functions. Everything goes out of sync and our words don't match up to what's in our minds.

What's interesting is that what usually brings about these fits of uncomfortableness differs from person to person, as evidenced by the stories below.

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