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(NJ.com/YouTube, @kelly_calame/Twitter)

There are many leisurely activities train commuters keep themselves occupied with – like reading a magazine – while in transit. Sanding down your calloused feet should never be one of them.

The New York Post featured a video of a man taking his personal hygiene to a gag-inducing-level by doing it publicly.


When it comes to grooming in public, this dude committed gross negligence.


Candy Hatsune Wolff was mortified sitting near the vicinity of the foot sandman during her Wednesday commute around 1 p.m.


The other passengers were oblivious to the detritus from the foot skin swirling around in the car.


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The man can be seen in the video using a Dremel to scrape off his callouses while on the southbound North Jersey Coast Line train headed for Long Branch.




Wolff took out her smartphone and recorded the scene.

She later told NJ.com, "I still don't know how he decided it was OK on the train. I guess the callus was bothering him."

"Should I take a picture? I don't want to humiliate him. Eventually I decided to."

Wolff believes she's the only witness and said that the man sloughed off his corns in peace.


Wolff posted the incident on her Facebook page, where it eventually caught the eye of Twitter.





Others were more forgiving and gave him the benefit of a doubt.





This isn't the first time someone publicly maintained their hygiene in public.

Another passenger was shamed for lathering up and shaving his beard while on board another NJ transit line.



The man who shaved in transit was later identified as Anthony Torres, according to the MSN. He told the Washington Post he was unable to work due to medical conditions and a prior work-related injury.

But after he was shamed for his indiscretion from a video of him posted online, people eventually had a change of heart when they discovered he was a homeless person just trying to make himself look presentable for a family visit.

Jordan Uhl of Washington started a GoFundMe campaign for Torres and managed to raise $38,000 in two days to help him get back on his feet.



H/T - YouTube, Twitter, MSN, NYpost, NJ.com

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