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Riverdale actress Lili Reinhart has always been open about her struggles with battling depression and anxiety.

After taking a break from social media, the 22-year-old returned to engage with her 15.9 million Instagram followers with an important update.

In a series of heartfelt posts on Instagram Stories, Reinhart told fans she is seeking professional help and is going back to therapy to treat her mental illness.


"I'm 22. I have anxiety and depression," she wrote in her fleeting Stories post. "And today I started therapy again. And so the journey of self-love begins for me."

Reinhart, who plays Betty Cooper in the popular CW drama, also informed fans there is no shame in anyone admitting they need help.

The advocate for mental health continued:

"Friendly reminder for anyone who needs to hear it: Therapy is never something to feel ashamed of. Everyone can benefit from seeing a therapist."
"Doesn't matter how old or 'proud' you're trying to be."

She also encouraged anyone suffering from depression to reach out.

There is always someone available who will listen.

"We are all human. And we all struggle. Don't suffer in silence...Don't feel embarrassed to ask for help."






Those suffering similar battles shared their stories and commended the actress for her courage.





In a Valentine's Day post, the actress declared her love for her co-star and boyfriend, Cole Sprouse, who plays Jughead Jones. The two have been enamored of each other but haven't spoken publicly about their budding romance.

"You make me very happy," she wrote. "Happy Valentine's Day, my love."



Sprouse later posted his own declaration of affection for his girl, writing, "Quite actually the only thing keeping me sane is @lilireinhart."



Based on the post above, that should give Reinhart something smile about.

Hang in there, Lili. You will get through your "journey of self-love."

You remain an inspiration to us all.

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