5-Year-Old Afghan Landmine Victim Does The Most Joyous Dance After Getting His New Prosthetic Leg

5-Year-Old Afghan Landmine Victim Does The Most Joyous Dance After Getting His New Prosthetic Leg
@SamarMinallahKh, @davidstehle/Twitter

A heartwarming video of a five-year-old Afghan amputee joyfully dancing on his new prosthetic leg is going viral across the internet.


Ahmad Rahman was just eight months old when he lost his right leg while caught in the middle of fighting between the Taliban and Afghan National Army in the Logar province of Afghanistan.

Although Ahmad has had a series of prosthetics, up until now the poorly fitted devices were too short or uncomfortable and his mobility was still severely limited.

Recently though Ahmad received a new prosthetic from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), and he couldn't help but dance for joy.

Now the video of Ahmad's beaming smile and cheerful celebration is going viral across the internet for its pure joyful innocence.


The video of Ahmad was taken by Mulkara Rahimi, a physotherapist working at the ICRC orthopaedic clinic in Kabul.

Rahimi, who spoke to the Press Association said she has known Ahmad "from day one" of his treatment.

Aside from dancing, thanks to his new leg Ahmad can now go to school.

"If there was any fight in school he could not run away like other kids." Rahimi said.

"So they didn't accept him. This kid doesn't go to school and doesn't have access to basic needs. Sometimes they don't even have food to eat."

Rahimi explained that unlike his new leg Ahmad's previous prosthetics caused him pain.

"Every time his prosthetic leg was either short or uncomfortable and was hurting his leg."

Ahmad's new leg however doesn't have the same problems.

"The fourth time it was not hurting him… he was happy that he can dance without any pain any more."

Now Ahmad can walk, go to school, and of course dance.

People across the internet were moved by Ahmad's spirit, joy and determination.











Unfortunately stories like Ahmad's are all too common in Afghanistan these days.





According to Rahimi injuries like Ahmad's are "very common," but most don't receive the same attention as Ahmad.

Rahimi says there are "plenty of other patients whose stories need to get viral."

"Our message to the world is: that you can take away our legs from us but you can't kill our spirits. For all those who create war we want to declare peace."
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