(Bruce Glikas/Bruce Glikas/WireImage, @_AACisneros, @NyleDiMarco/Twitter)

Fan Spots ANTM Winner Nyle DiMarco At The Airport—And DiMarco Spots Him Back 😂

Adrian Cisneros isn't shy about sharing his amorous feelings on Twitter.

He was waiting for his flight at the airport when he noticed hunky deaf activist, Nyle DiMarco, just a few feet away.

Smitten over the actor/model, Cisneros took to Twitter to share his current mood: "When you spot @NyleDiMarco at the airport **faints silently**"

After posting his tweet, the jetsetter was surprised with a one-way ticket to bliss.



Cisneros got a direct response from the dreamy actor.

DiMarco tweeted back with a video asking for an identity confirmation. In the video, the model stealthily zoomed right into the unsuspecting admirer.


Having nowhere to hide, Cisneros came clean.


But DiMarco, being the classy guy that he is, turned what could've been an awkward situation into a friendly one by extending an invitation.


Cisneros' innocuous tweet led to a cute thread and a brilliant photo opp.




Go after your dreams.





A brilliant summary.




Their exchange left people with a warm and fuzzy feeling.








Others commented on the handsome pairing.







This user began aspiring towards a similar chance encounter.



In 2015, Nyle DiMarco became the first deaf male model to win The CW's America's Next Top Model Cycle 22.

The 29-year-old continued his winning streak the following year when he was crowned the winner of ABC's Dancing with the Stars for the reality competition's 22nd season.

He speaks in American Sign Language (ASL) and raises awareness for the hearing impaired.



Going to the movies is not particularly enjoyable for deaf audiences - especially when fewer theaters are offering open captions.

The missing option isolates those with disabilities from the rest of the audience.

"I think it's really important for me to be vocal about this," he said. "Because I do have a platform, and I represent a lot of types of members of the deaf community."

"Open captions are not for the 466 million deaf people alone. They're beneficial for people who have ADHD, people who are autistic, people have learning disabilities, and even people who want to learn a new language. Open captions are very helpful in that way."

You can watch DiMarco share what it's like for deaf people going to the movies in the NowThis News YouTube clip below:




H/T - Wikipedia, Twitter

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