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American actress Elizabeth Gillies is going places.

On September 28th, the 25-year-old filmed herself in a fiery red dress and demonstrated her mad sashaying skills through the set of the CW's Dynasty reboot in which she stars as "Fallon Carrington."

And now her fierce strut with purpose has become a Twitter meme.


And...5, 6, 7, 8!


Look at her focus. She is determined. She will not be messed with. This is Elizabeth Gillies, and she is all dressed up and everywhere to go.

It didn't take long before Twitter added their own captions to her video – like this one, where one user claimed that Gillies "invented walking."


Ever said "goodbye" and made the wrong exit? This is surely the look of someone fixing that faux pas.


Nothing can match the pride of budding performers experiencing the high of finishing a successful run of a show.


Disney Parks fans know about the V.I.P. treatment associated with the perk of Fastpasses.


When equestrians refuse to let a horse get the best of you, this is how you dust yourself off.


The show isn't over when you leave comic-con in your costume.


This is the look of determination when you want to save face.


Yes, Tom Hardy from Venom leaves us hot and bothered. But for one user, it's #goals.


When you don't want all the melted ice to ruin the brew you ordered conveniently in advance.



One thing was confirmed by her walk with purpose.


Elizabeth Gillies is a New Jersey native. She got her start acting in commercials but her career took off with her first major TV appearance as a series regular in The Black Donnellys (2007).

She made her Broadway debut in the musical 13 when the actress was 15-years-old. She shared the stage with Ariana Grande, who would later co-star with Gillies in Nickelodeon's Victorious in 2010.

The current Dynasty star is just getting started in her career. As you can see, she's got places to go.

H/T - DailyDot, Twitter, Buzzfeed

Clint Patterson/Unsplash

Conspiracy theories are beliefs that there are covert powers that be changing the course of history for their own benefits. It's how we see the rise of QAnon conspiracies and people storming the capital.

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The Association for Psychological Science published a paper that reviewed some of the research:

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The paranormal seems to be consistently in unrest, which sounds like death isn't any more fun or tranquil than life. So much for something to look forward to.

Some ghosts just like to scare it up. It's not always like "Ghosthunters" the show.

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A lot of talk going on about women's bodies, isn't there?

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