(@ynd239.20_cafe/Instagram)

Sometimes, the world can be in black or white, and it's a good thing.

A unique cafe opened in Seoul last year in which patrons are transported to a two-dimensional world in black and white.

Once inside, Cafe Yeonnam-dong 239-20 customers enjoy light snacks and beverages in which the floors, walls, and even the furniture are white, accented with black lines to highlight the edges.




The Instagrammable decor is all an optical illusion, embellished with the likes of cacti, blank picture frames, and a curious puppy looking in through a window.



The beverages get to participate in the fun, with whimsically designed paper cups. Can you drink it all in?







The furniture looks like an illustration, but you can have a seat in this cartoon world.



If you wear black or white, you might just blend right into the scenery.



The curtains perfectly frame the cute setting, beckoning customers inside.







So, the cushions aren't fluffy at all. But you'll still find the place quite cozy.







Some iced coffee or tea to go with your mood.



There's detail on every surface inside the cafe.



Chocolate and vanilla on the menu to go with the color scheme. They thought of everything.



The brick wall and live greenery enhance the scene.


Mood.



This one can't contain himself.



Perfect spot for a date. And a photobomb.



Thank you, and have a wonderful day!


JS Lee, the marketing manager for the cafe, said the cafe's name, Yeon-Nam-Dong 239-20, simply refers to its address.

He told CNN Travel that the main objective for the cafe was to provide a memorable experience for its guests.

"It's been successful because our customers all take pictures," Lee says. "We became famous very naturally."

The cafe has become so popular, Lee said that the owners are considering starting a franchise to take the illustrative cafe concept abroad.

Who knows? It could be a matter of time before you find yourself within this magical world and upping your Insta-game.

H/T - Twitter, CNN, Instagram, Colossal

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash

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