JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!
Photo by Bruce Glikas/Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic via Getty Images

Al Roker's son Nick, who is "somewhere on the spectrum and maybe obsessive-compulsive" has faced his share of daily challenges.

But through all that, Roker has made it clear that Nick isn't only someone he feels responsible for, but someone he "admires."


Nick, who was born on July 18th, 2002, had an unclear prognosis on his mental state that left both Roker and his wife, ABC News journalist Deborah Roberts, uncertain for his future.

But as Nick began to develop, Roker said that "proud" didn't even begin to cover how he felt about his son.

"'You must be proud of your son,'" someone will say."
"Yes, I am. More than they'll ever know. The obstacles in this kid's way were things that might have tripped up many others. Not Nick, not even with the disabilities he was born with."






Roker recounts that Nick's disability hardly ever arose and disrupted his progress:

"Nick blossomed, far more than Deborah or I could have ever expected, given his original iffy prognosis. In tae kwon do, you have to master systematic sequences of moves to progress to the next level. Turned out that all those repetitive drills were just the thing for Nick. Where his OCD nature can be a drawback in some situations, it was a strength here. And he proved to be very competitive. 'I'm going to get my black belt,' he told us."







"'Don't push it,' I wanted to say, 'You don't have to aim so high.' You hate to see your kid disappointed. But who were we to hold back our son? His sister Leila was doing tae kwon do too, and maybe he wanted to prove something to her—and to himself."
"He did earn his black belt—Leila got her red belt, one notch below. Deborah and I were pleased for both of them. After that, though, Nick decided he'd achieved his goal and was ready for other challenges. Since then he's been taking swimming, chess and basketball lessons."






"Do I get frustrated with my son sometimes? You bet," Roker wrote.

"But then I remember my dad, how understanding he was. And Deborah reminds me that I have to show my son not only that I love him but that I like him as well. More than that, I admire him."



Roker's feelings are familiar to many families with special needs children.

And for those of us who can't relate, we can relate to the unconditional love and willingness to be surprised that Roker brings to his child.

There is a world full of mysteries to explore right at our very feet.

Do we engage with it on a level that might make us more uncomfortable? Well, if we really want to learn everything there is to know about our planet earth, we have to engage in the unsettling facts. They appear across every discipline.

Keep reading... Show less
Pixabay.com

Let's be honest, most of us don't read the Terms and Conditions before we click that little "I Agree" button. Most of you probably aren't even going to read this intro.

A huge chunk of you are going to open this article and immediately scroll to "the meat" because we're all about getting to the good stuff. But that rush can sometimes mean missing out on some seriously important tidbits of info.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by RitaE from Pixabay

Death is scary. It brings the unknown of the great beyond, whether that's heaven, some other afterlife, or total nothingness, depending on what you believe.

But there is one perk that comes with death: total control of your funeral.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by Pexels from Pixabay

After we've watched a movie, it can be difficult to imagine the film as a project that took months or years to finally culminate into the product we see at the theater or on our television.

But it was built and hacked together, piece by piece.

Keep reading... Show less