Al Roker Shares His Pride In Raising A Son With Special Needs
Photo by Bruce Glikas/Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic via Getty Images

Al Roker's son Nick, who is "somewhere on the spectrum and maybe obsessive-compulsive" has faced his share of daily challenges.

But through all that, Roker has made it clear that Nick isn't only someone he feels responsible for, but someone he "admires."


Nick, who was born on July 18th, 2002, had an unclear prognosis on his mental state that left both Roker and his wife, ABC News journalist Deborah Roberts, uncertain for his future.

But as Nick began to develop, Roker said that "proud" didn't even begin to cover how he felt about his son.

"'You must be proud of your son,'" someone will say."
"Yes, I am. More than they'll ever know. The obstacles in this kid's way were things that might have tripped up many others. Not Nick, not even with the disabilities he was born with."






Roker recounts that Nick's disability hardly ever arose and disrupted his progress:

"Nick blossomed, far more than Deborah or I could have ever expected, given his original iffy prognosis. In tae kwon do, you have to master systematic sequences of moves to progress to the next level. Turned out that all those repetitive drills were just the thing for Nick. Where his OCD nature can be a drawback in some situations, it was a strength here. And he proved to be very competitive. 'I'm going to get my black belt,' he told us."







"'Don't push it,' I wanted to say, 'You don't have to aim so high.' You hate to see your kid disappointed. But who were we to hold back our son? His sister Leila was doing tae kwon do too, and maybe he wanted to prove something to her—and to himself."
"He did earn his black belt—Leila got her red belt, one notch below. Deborah and I were pleased for both of them. After that, though, Nick decided he'd achieved his goal and was ready for other challenges. Since then he's been taking swimming, chess and basketball lessons."






"Do I get frustrated with my son sometimes? You bet," Roker wrote.

"But then I remember my dad, how understanding he was. And Deborah reminds me that I have to show my son not only that I love him but that I like him as well. More than that, I admire him."



Roker's feelings are familiar to many families with special needs children.

And for those of us who can't relate, we can relate to the unconditional love and willingness to be surprised that Roker brings to his child.

People Explain Which Lessons Aren't Taught In History Class But Should Be
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It's highly believed that it is important to learn history as a means to improve our future.

What is often overlooked is that what is taught in history class is going to be very different depending on where you went to school.

And this isn't just internationally, even different regions of the United states will likely have very different lessons on American history.

This frequently results in our learning fascinating, heartbreaking and horrifying historical facts which our middle or high school history teachers neglected to teach us.

Redditor Acherontia_atropos91 was curious to learn things people either wished they had learned, or believe they should have learned, in their school history class, leading them to ask:

What isn’t taught in history class but should be?
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People Share The Most Random Things They Miss About Life Before The Pandemic
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So apparently we are in the endemic phase of this nonsense.

We have light at the end of the tunnel.

So what now?

Where do we go from here?

Normal seems like an outdated word.

How do we get back to normal though?

Is it even possible?

What are reaching back to?

Life pre-Covid.

Those were the days.

If only we could bring them back.

Redditor hetravelingsong wanted to discuss our new normal in this hopeful "endemic" phase. So they asked:

"What’s something random you miss about pre-COVID times?"
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Atheists Break Down What They Actually Do Believe In
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What do you believe?

Is there a GOD in the sky?

Is he guiding us and helping us?

Life is really hard. Why is that is a big entity is up there loving us?

Atheists have taken a lot of heat for what feels like shunning GOD.

What if they've been right all along?

Maybe let's take a listen and see what they really think.

Redditor __Jacob______ wanted to hear from the people who don't really believe all that "God" stuff. They asked:

"Atheists, what do you believe in?"
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The list of what irritates me is endless.

I mean... breathing too loud or dust can set me off.

I'm a bit unstable, yes.

But I'm not alone.

So let's discuss.

Redditor Aburntbagel6 wanted to hear about all the times many of us just couldn't control our disdain. They asked:

"What never fails to piss you off?"
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