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Bridezilla (n): Formed from blending of the words bride and Godzilla; used to describe a woman whose behavior becomes outrageously bad in the course of planning for her wedding.

People on Reddit were asked: "Did you ever attend a wedding that was a complete disaster? What happened?" Reddit user colourful_opinion had, by far, one of the best answers.



"Back in my youth, I was a wedding photographer, so sit down and let me regale you with the worst wedding I ever shot.

The groom was a childhood friend of mine who grew up one block over. Our parents knew each other and liked each other, but he was a bit of a douchebag as a kid, so we lost touch about the start of puberty. The day I got the call about the wedding, I was 28, so I hadn't seen the guy in 15 years, at least.

My Mom was the caller, and she asked me to actually be in his wedding party. I told her the obvious, that I didn't much like the guy back then, we hadn't even spoken in a decade and a half, and I really didn't think that meant I was good for his wedding party. My Mom told me that he hadn't had literally any friends over the years, so this would be a personal favour to her and to his Mom. As part of the favour, my Mom and I would do the photography of the wedding as our wedding gift. Reluctantly, I agreed.

So, I go over to meet everyone after all this time, and within seconds I realize why I'm being asked for the favour. The friend hasn't brushed his teeth in years, and they are one solid mass. His bride is massively overweight and overbearing beyond belief. I suck it up, do my best, but the 4 months leading in are a nightmare.

But, then the wedding happens, and after the ceremony (which was actually nice), the bride decides literally out of the blue that she wants to have a white limo take her to the Hilton. It's June, there's no limos to be had, the Hilton is booked, but the best man (the groom's older brother) is furiously trying to find something and pay for it on his credit card because the bride is in full meltdown mode.


In a fury, she rips her headpiece out, taking about 1/3 of her hair with it, and storms into the back room of the hall. The groom says he's going to try and talk her down, and goes back there with her. A few minutes later, the double doors of the back room slam open and he comes running out, with a butcher knife through his palm. He's streaming blood and screaming. She tackles him from behind, yanks the knife out of his hand (oh, that sound!), and looks like she's going to stab him to death in front of the entire assembly.

The best man and I both tackle her at once, and we're both grown men, but she's a total hellcat. The groom slips out, gets out of the hall, and runs to his car, but she also squirms free after biting the best man, and is maybe 30s behind the groom. He's just backed out and as he puts it into drive, she leaps on the hood and grabs the wipers. He guns it, and as he bottoms out on the exit of the parking lot and yanks the wheel, she rolls off into the street and drills the far curb. As we run up to her, she's scratched all to hell and she's bawling.

The wedding got annulled the next day.

Turns out she'd been psychotic several times during her adolescence and adulthood, and was on a bevy of pills every day. She decided on her own not to take her meds on her wedding day because she wanted to be totally clear for the ceremony.

Bad decision."

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