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LGBTQ acceptance, despite our many advances, still has a ways to go.

But Twilight actress Kristen Stewart noted how far we've come in regards to coming out and claiming one sexual identity.

The 29-year-old actress told the Associated Press that she is happy that today's youth aren't faced with the similar pressures of having a "huge responsibility" in discussing sexuality as she has in the past.


Kristen outed herself on SNL two years ago when she said she was "like so gay, dude."

At the time, she was under immense pressure.

"I felt this huge responsibility, like one that I was really genuinely worried about if I wasn't able to say one way or the other, then was I sort of like forsaking a side."


Stewart had previously dated men, including her Twilight co-star Robert Pattinson. But when she was spotted with other women, she found herself forced to confront her sexuality, publicly.

She worried whether or not declaring a definitive sexual identity would have consequences.

"Are people gonna look at me and say 'you're not setting an example'?"
"The fact that you don't have to [label yourself] now is so much more truthful."

Stewart commented on how different the culture is now, with younger stars being more open with gender fluidity and sexuality.



It was something she had been "gunning for" for a long time.

"If you were to have this conversation with someone like in high school, they'd probably like roll their eyes and go, 'Why are you complicating everything so much? Like just sort of do what you want to do.' "
"I was gunning for that for a long time, so it's like, thank you. Kids, lead the way. It's really nice."

She concluded by saying a person is not defined by their sexual preferences.

It's much more complicated now.

"Whether you like girls or boys doesn't even begin to describe who you are on the inside. I just feel like we don't even have the words to describe the complexities of identity right now."




Stewart was less secretive when dating multiple women after she was caught cheating on Pattinson with her Snow White and the Huntsman director Rupert Sanders in 2012.

She and Pattinson immediately broke up after a photo of Stewart and Sanders in an intimate embrace surfaced.

She began dating New Zealand model Stella Maxwell in late 2016, and wanted the public to know she wasn't feeling "ashamed" about being with other partners, according to the Daily Mail.

"I was like, 'Actually, to hide this provides the implication that I'm not down with it or I'm ashamed of it,' so I had to alter how I approached being in public. It opened my life up and I'm so much happier."

She and Maxwell parted ways in December 2018.

Stewart currently stars in Amazon Prime's J.T. Leroy, based on a true story about a woman who disguises herself as a male author while making public appearances.

Here's to 2019, where we should be free to be who we want to be without having to explain.

Stewart's latest film, Lizzie about Lizzie Borden, is available here.

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