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John Hadyniak's story of averting a potential disaster may make you think twice about helping others.

Driving on his way home at 10 p.m. on Sunday, the mechanic of Belleville, Michigan, saw a women in distress off the I-94. She was attempting to change a tire off the side of the busy highway near Belleville road. He wasn't about to feign ignorance and drive away.

But once his instinct to help the woman kicked in, something seemed off about the scenario when he pulled over and got out of the car.

After a brief assessment of the situation, his intuition to flee the scene may have saved his life.




Locals news WXYZ of ABC reported reminders to always trust your instincts.

Hadyniak told the news station about the red flags that made him suspicious.

"I noticed that there was no jack and she had a tire iron in her hand. Things didn't add up. It was just a bad feeling."

Going off of a gut feeling, Hadyniak pulled out his flashlight.

"I put the flashlight on her when I got out of the car. And about 15 feet off the side of the road there was a guy laying in the grass."
"I hit him with the light. He got up and jumped in the car and took off down I-94."


He decided to warn others on Facebook about his close call.

He was lucky. His altruistic tendency could have resulted in something far worse that night.

"Worse case scenario, I could have got bopped in the head with that, laid dead on the side of the expressway."
"(They could have) robbed me, stole my car – everything. If I wouldn't have seen him, it would have been bad news."

Unfortunately, the incident made others skeptical about helping others who actually do need help. But they were glad Hadyniak was okay.








Here is a YouTube video of the WXYZ-TV Detroit news report.




Hadyniak filed a police report involving the couple driving the silver Nissan Sentra.


H/T - AJC, GettyImages, Twitter, Facebook, ABC7

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