George R.R. Martin Just Confirmed A Popular 'Game Of Thrones' Fan Theory About White Walkers
(Tim P. Whitby/Getty Images)

Game of Thrones scribe George R.R. Martin is promoting his new book in the A Song of Ice and Fire series, and provided insight into a group of characters fans have been waiting to learn more about.

As an author known to inject symbolism into the fantastical worlds he creates, Martin revealed that the icy group of White Walkers from Game of Thrones personified climate change.


What the ancient humanoid race of icy creatures stand for is a concept many have theorized all along.

Now fans received confirmation from the author himself.

Martin may have prognosticated climate change while he was writing GoT. The cold that transcends upon Westeros sounds eerily familiar.

"It's kind of ironic," Martin told the New York Times.

"Because I started writing 'Game of Thrones' all the way back in 1991, long before anybody was talking about climate change."
"But there is — in a very broad sense — there's a certain parallel there. And the people in Westeros are fighting their individual battles over power and status and wealth."




He added:

"And those are so distracting them that they're ignoring the threat of 'winter is coming,' which has the potential to destroy all of them and to destroy their world."



"And there is a great parallel there to, I think, what I see this planet doing here, where we're fighting our own battles. We're fighting over issues, important issues, mind you — foreign policy, domestic policy, civil rights, social responsibility, social justice. All of these things are important."





Martin continued:

"But while we're tearing ourselves apart over this and expending so much energy, there exists this threat of climate change, which, to my mind, is conclusively proved by most of the data and 99.9 percent of the scientific community. And it really has the potential to destroy our world."
"And we're ignoring that while we worry about the next election and issues that people are concerned about, like jobs."



Marten stressed the importance of caring for the environment, adding that protecting it should be a top priority.

"So really, climate change should be the number one priority for any politician who is capable of looking past the next election."



"We spend 10 times as much energy and thought and debate in the media discussing whether or not N.F.L. players should stand for the national anthem than this threat that's going to destroy our world."

When the author was asked if he could "pick the best real-world, present-day match — politicians, celebrities" and pair them up with corresponding characters from his novels, Martin answered: "Pass."

Fire and Blood: 300 Years Before a Game of Thrones, is expected to be released on November 20.




H/T - NYtimes, Twitter, Mentalfloss

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