JOIN
OUR EMAIL LIST!

(The June installment of George Takei's monthly column has been canceled
because of his mother's passing. George's column is scheduled to return in July.)

Obituary

Fumiko Emily Takei passed away in Los Angeles on May 25, 2002, after a long illness. She was 89.

She was born in Florin, California, on September 29, 1912. She was the daughter of Benkichi and Shigeno Nakamura.

In 1922, her parents sent Fumiko to Japan to be educated. She returned to California, and, in 1935, she married Takekuma Takei in Los Angeles.

With the outbreak of World War II, Fumiko and her family together with 120,000 other Japanese Americans were placed behind the barbed-wire enclosures of United States internment camps. They were evacuated from their Los Angeles home in 1942, first to the Santa Anita Race Track assembly center, then to the internment camp at Rohwer, Arkansas, and then to the internment camp at Tule Lake, California. They returned to Los Angeles after the war.

Widowed in 1979, she was active in the Hompa Hongwanji Buddhist Temple and the Pioneer Center. She was a dedicated volunteer at the Koreisha Chushoku Kai senior citizens hot meal program.

Fumiko and her husband were avid travelers, having covered almost all the continents of the globe. They had been to the African countries of Kenya and Tanzania, Iran, Egypt, India, Singapore, Tahiti, Bora Bora, the Russian cities of Moscow and St. Petersburg, South America, Europe, and Asia. In recent years, she joined her son George on cruises to Alaska, Bermuda, Mexico, and the Caribbean.

She is survived by her children George Takei, Henry Takei, and Nancy Reiko Takei, all of Los Angeles; her grandchildren, Scott Takei of Los Angeles and Akemi Louchheim of Seattle; two great-grandchildren, Hana and Markus Takei of Los Angeles; and her sisters Yukiko Tamura of Hiroshima, Japan, and Setsuko Thurlow of Toronto, Canada. Fumiko's and Takekuma's first-born child, Furuto, died in infancy.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Japanese American National Museum, 369 East First Street, Los Angeles, CA 90012.

Image by Denise Husted from Pixabay

Getting disowned by your family can either be absolutely devastating or a massive relief. Either way, usually it's to get rid of toxicity within a family structure, whether on purpose or an unintentional result of the situation.

Here are a few stories about being disowned by family members, from the side of the person who was disowned. Heads up, these might get a little ugly.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by gabrielle_cc from Pixabay

We all have our vulnerable moments we try our best to keep hidden.

They say, "Never let see you sweat," but sometimes that is easier said than done.

Keep reading... Show less
Image by cem çevikayak from Pixabay

Rules, rules, rules... we all need them yes, but some are just plain ridiculous. Of course life would be chaos without order, well more chaotic but let's not micro-manage every little thing. Of course every once and a while an unintentionally good surprise can spring from nonsense. Rule makers should really think long and hard before they implement anything severe. You never know when it's gonna bite you.

Redditor u/TabblespoonFarmer3 wanted to know how we could apply all "the rules" into our own lives by asking... People of Reddit, What stupid rule at your work/school backfired beautifully?
Keep reading... Show less
Image by Engin Akyurt from Pixabay

The naming process of new life is an enormous responsibility and can be an emotionally exhausting decision. This person is going to be glued to this "title" forever, or until they're tired of being saddled to it so they change it; when they're free of their parent's constant gaze. Thankfully I will never have children but I do have to name pets. And that is taxing as well. Thankfully there are people around who can set us all straight when we're not thinking straight.

Redditor u/Kubanochoerus wanted to hear about some of the bad ideas they were able to help avert by asking... Nurses and midwives of Reddit, have you ever tried to talk new parents out of a baby name? What was it?
Keep reading... Show less