wisdom

The Best Examples Of 'You'll Understand It When You're Older'
Becca Ayala on Unsplash

As we all know, wisdom is earned with time and life experience. Try explaining that to youngsters when they have questions that are too complicated for them to grasp.

Kids will always be inquisitive but they usually aren't ready to receive answers–especially when the subjects are related to the concepts of romantic passion and death.

The best response to give a child when they ask about a mature topic is what Mrs. Potts (R.I.P. Angela Lansbury) told Chip in response to his observation of the budding romance between Belle and the Beast:

"I'll tell you when you're older."
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Bad Life Hacks And Terrible Advice That Is Also Quite Dangerous
Photo by Mark König on Unsplash

A lot of people think they know everything.

Not just know everything... they think they're experts on everything.

So they always have the best "advice" to give.

A lot of it is nonsense.

Listen to your gut more when something seems suspect.

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People Divulge Which Things They Swear To Be True Even Without Tangible Proof
Photo by Ben White on Unsplash

Whenever someone requests you to back up whatever wisdom or knowledge you just imparted, you somehow doubt if whatever you verbalized is actually true.

Without explanation, sometimes you just know things to be absolutely true. Call it your gut or strong spidey sense, but many of us have these moments where we are at a loss for words but innately know something to be undeniably accurate.

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People Confess Which Pieces Of Life Advice Can F**k Right Off
Daniel Herron on Unsplash

When a person sees someone they care about going through a struggle or crisis, their instinct is to uplift them with positive advice.

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People Break Down Which Pieces Of Life Advice Can F*** Right Off
engin akyurt on Unsplash

Most people have become conditioned to invoke cliches when consoling or encouraging others.

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