genetics

On occasion, all of us look in a mirror and wish there was something about our physical characteristics that was different.

Being a few inches taller, having a different hair color, maybe a smaller nose.

But then, as we continue to stare at our reflection, we might suddenly realize there are some things about ourselves which we don't mind at all.

In fact, we might even be proud of our eye color, the shape of our ears, or having an enviable jawline.

For most people, finding their best attribute might not be so difficult to determine, owing to slim pickings.

But for those blessed with good genetics, choosing their best physical trait might be a bit more difficult.


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We all have certain things about ourselves we would love to change.

Many aspects of our bodies, inside and out is the first thing to come to mind.

And what's frustrating is that many of those things we're passed down to us thanks to DNA.

Certain diseases and bodily aspects "run in the family."

Which often feels like a cosmic joke.

We have to learn to embrace it.

So let's do some venting...

Redditor dump_acc_91 wanted to hear about what generational issues have been passed along to many of us.

They asked:

"Which sh**ty genetics did you inherit?"
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In the life-defining battle for joy and contentedness, self-acceptance stands as a major prerequisite. We cannot change the things that are out of our control.

Feeling good only comes when we let go of our anger or sadness about those uncontrollable elements.

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We can't all be so lucky. There are instances where our parents and grandparents and great-grandparents were just more fortunate than us. Sometimes our DNA fails us, which sucks. But what can you do, right?

leclair63 asked: In what ways did you lose the genetic lottery?

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Scientists Use Gene Editing To Make Monkey Brains More Human And We've All Seen This Movie Before
9883074/Pixabay

According to China Daily, a joint research group from China and the United States recently published a paper in the National Science Review on their findings from using gene-editing techniques to make rhesus macaques with a human gene related to brain development.

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