Believe it or not, we now live in a world where you can have a surrogate wear an iPad mask and participate in life for you.


According to Select All, Japanese researcher Jun Rekimoto presented his new tech, called ChameleonMask, at MIT Tech Review's EmTech this week.

ChameleonMask "uses a real human as a surrogate for another remote user," by giving the surrogate "a mask-shaped display that shows a remote user's live face, and a voice channel transmits a remote user's voice."

We know what you're thinking...


GIPHY

Actually, I'm pretty sure some of you are thinking this:


GIPHY

Think of it this way: You need to go grocery shopping but you don't want to leave the house. No problem! With ChameleonMask, you can send someone in your place while you beam your face onto a iPad and guide them through your shopping list.

You can watch a video of ChameleonMask in action here:


ChameleonMask: Embodied Physical and Social Telepresence using human surrogatesyoutu.be

How do people wearing ChameleonMask actually see? That doesn't seem quite clear.

People certainly have opinions.






Telepresence technology has been around for a while.

In 2015, for example, James Vincent described using a robot "Double," a telepresence bot from Double Robotics, as combining "the fun of a remote-controlled car with the thrill of videoconferencing."

"It's best described as an iPad on a Segway because, well, that's basically what it is," Vincent wrote at the time. "There is a pair of squat wheels at the bottom and a telescoping pole that extends from three feet to five feet tall."

"At the top of this, there's a jig for an iPad (sold separately unfortunately), and the whole arrangement is self-balancing. You log in like a Skype call—either via a mobile app or website—and then you're presented with controls to move the bot around, while a loudspeaker attachment lets you sound your barbaric yawp over the cubicles of the world."


I used a robot to go to work from 3,500 miles awayyoutu.be

People Share The Biggest Bachelor Party Or Wedding Day Disasters They've Ever Seen

Weddings, and the festivities leading up to them, are a major milestone in many people's lives. The sheer stress and effort that go into planning a wedding are usually enough to make people realize they should try hard not to screw things up.

Sometimes that isn't the case though, and when things go wrong they often go very, very wrong.

Keep reading...Show less

Our parents should be able––and willing––to protect us and to fight for our best interests. But that's not always the case, and the unlucky ones can spend years seeking mental health counseling to figure out what went wrong.

Our parents are human and they have the ability to disappoint us and devastate us like anyone else. It just hurts a little more, as we were reminded once Redditor banbidoe asked the online community,

"What's the worst thing your parents ever said to you?"
Keep reading...Show less
Cashiers Break Down Which Items Cause Them To Silently Judge Customers

It's human nature to have various opinions about the people we come across.

What sets us apart from heathens is that we keep our judgments to ourselves–especially when they are not of the flattering variety.

The people who probably interact with strangers the most are those who work in any type of service industry, and they should be good about keeping their mouths shut if they don't have anything nice to say about a customer or of their purchases.

Keep reading...Show less
People Divulge Which Instances Of The Mandela Effect Freaked Them Out The Most

The Mandela effect is when multiple people share the same, incorrect memory.

Its name stems from when paranormal researcher Fiona Broome falsely believed that the future president of South Africa, Nelson Mandela, died in prison in the 1980s.

A false memory she shared with a number of others.

Our memories have been known to deceive us, as we might frequently forget someone's name or one of our numerous online passwords.

But when we share a memory that turns out to be false with many others, convincing ourselves it wasn't the truth can be a very difficult ordeal indeed.

Keep reading...Show less